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Full text of "The Pine Knot"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://archive.org/details/pineknot1920atla 




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Board of Trustees 



Terms Expire 1920 

J. W. Hines Rocky Mount, N. C. 

S. G. Mewborn, Secretary Wilson, N. C. 

W. E. Stubbs Belhaven, N. C. 

C. W. Howard Kinston, N. C. 

A. J. Moye Farmville, N. C. 

Terms Expire 1921 

Georce Hackney, Chairman Wilson, N. C. 

Claude Kiser Greensboro, N. C. 

J. F. Taylor Kinston, N. C. 

W. C. Manning Williamston, N. C. 

L. J. Chapman Grifton, N. C. 

Terms Expire 1922 

N. J. Rouse Kinston, N. C. 

J. M. Waters Arapahoe, N. C. 

J. E. Stuart Wilson, N. C. 

G. T. Gardner Grifton, N. C. 

Hayes Farish Belhaven, N. C. 



Foreword 



This volume of the Pine Knot is issued by the 
editors to the friends of Atlantic Christian College 
as a record of the past collegiate year. Although 
our classes are small and many difficulties con- 
fronted us, we do not apologize for this book, be- 
cause we have put our best efforts in its production. 
We hope that the following pages will give you 
pleasure and increase your love for A.C.C. 



TO 

FRANCES F. HARPER 

IN TRUE GRATITUDE FOR HER LOYAL SERVICES 

TO 

ATLANTIC CHRISTIAN COLLEGE 

THIS VOLUME OF THE PINE KNOT IS 

DEDICATED 



Raymond A. Smith, A.M., B.D. 

President 

In the spirit of sincere gratefulness for the untiring interest 
and devotion of Dr. Smith to Atlantic Christian College we wish 
to express our most hearty appreciation. The College has made 
great forward strides during the four years of his administration. 
Several active and successful campaigns have been launched 
during his administration to increase the financial side of the 
College. At present there is a campaign under way to raise 
$225,000 within our churches of the State, which we know is to 
meet with success. The College is now on a better financial 
basis than she has been for many years. Further than this, the 
College has made progress educationally. 

We would mention the happy associations we have had with 
Dr. Smith. He has ever been interested in the students and 
faculty and always does what he can for their good and for their 
pleasure and happiness. We know that his services will ever 
be appreciated, not only here in the college, but all over the 
State. Let us all give hearty cooperation to Dr. Smith and 
Atlantic Christian College, that Christian education shall go 
forward in our ranks. 





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Mrs. Raymond A. Smith 



10 




11 




PERRY CASE, A.B., B.D. 

Professor of Philosophy and Religious 
Education 

Indianapolis Business College, 1903; 
College of the Bible, Lexington, Ky., 
1912; A.B., Butler College, 1914; B.D., 
Butler College, 1916; City Missionary 
for Broadway Christian Church, Lexing- 
ton, Ky., 1908-1912; Minister Columbia 
Place Christian Church, Indianapolis, 
Ind., 1912-1915; Rural Work, Wayne 
County, Ind., 1915-1916; Teacher of A. 
C. College, 1916-20. 




ELLA H. SMITH 

Dean oj If omen 



12 



HOWARD STEVENS HILLEY, A.B. 

Professor of Ancient and Modern 
Languages 

Graduate of Transylvania College, 
1913; Oxford University, 1917; Student 
of University of Grenoble, 1916; Pro- 
fessor of History and Language, South- 
eastern Christian College, 1917-1918; 
Director of Vocational Guidance, At- 
lanta, Ga., 1918-1919; Pastor, East Point 
Christian Church, 1917-1918; Present 
position, 1919- 




FREDERICK F. GRIM 

Professor of Education 

A.B., Drake University, 1894; A.M., 
Bethany College, 1914; Graduate stu- 
dent Drake University, 1894-1895; 
Graduate student University of Chicago, 
1900; Graduate student Chicago Theo- 
logical Seminary, 1901; Graduate stu- 
dent of University Chicago, 1901-1902; 
Graduate of Columbia University Sum- 
mer School, 1914, 1919; Chautauqua, 
N. Y., Summer School, 1918; Present 
position, 1918- 




13 




FRANCES F. HARPER, A.B. 

Professor of Mathematics 

Graduate of Kinsey Seminary; Special 
student of Mathematics, Knoxville Nor- 
mal and University of Virginia; Instruc- 
tor of Mathematics, A. C. College, 1904- 
1920. 




ETHEL McDIARMID GRIM, A.M. 

Professor of English 

Graduate of Bethany College. 1897; 
A.M., Bethany College, 1914; Graduate 
of Emerson College of Oratory, Boston, 
1900; Graduate student in English, Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati, 1904-1905; Head 
of Department of Expression and In- 
structor in English, Grove City College, 
Grove City, Pennsylvania, 1901-1904; 
Professor of English, Herford College, 
Herford, Texas, 1905-1908; Professor 
of English, Beckley Institute, Beckley, 
West Virginia, 1908-1915; Present posi- 
tion since 1918. 



14 



LEONARD B. BRABEC, A.B. 

Professor of Science 

Graduate of Kasson High School, 
Kasson, Minn., 1913; Summer School 
Training Course for Teachers, State Uni- 
versity, Minn., 1913; Teacher, West 
Concord, Minn., 1913-1914; Graduate 
Macalester Conservatory of Music, St. 
Paul, Minn., 1918; A.B., Macalester 
College, St. Paul, Minn., 1918; United 
States Chemical Warfare Service, 1918- 
1919; Student, Johns Hopkins Univers- 
ity Summer School, 1919; Present posi- 
tion, 1919- 




MYRTLE L. HARPER 

Librarian 

Library Methods; Professional Cer- 
tificate, University of Virginia Summer 
School, 1911 and 1916. 




15 




IVY MAY SMITH, B.Mus. 

Director oj the School oj Music 

Classes in Piano — Theory, Harmony and 

Counterpoint 

Graduate pupil of the Metropolitan 
School of Music, and Post-graduate 
pupil of the Cooperative School of Mu- 
sic, Indianapolis, Indiana; Degree of 
Bachelor of Music, Indiana University; 
Pupil of Leo Sampaix, Syracuse, New 
York; Present position since 1916. 




LILLIAN CHAPMAN 

Assistant Piano Instructor 

Classes in Piano, Musical Form and Analysis, 

and Musical Appreciation 

Graduate pupil and Post-graduate 
pupil of Atlantic Christian College 
School of Music; Graduate pupil of 
Mrs. Harry Prentice. Dunning System. 
New York; Present position since 1917. 



16 



MARIE POWERS BROTHERS 

Director of the Voice Department 

Class in Voice Culture, Sight-singing, History 

of Music, and Glee Club 

Graduate pupil of Crouse College, 
Fine Arts; Syracuse University, Syra- 
cuse, New York; Pupil of Frank Orms- 
by and Paule Savage, New York; Pres- 
ent position, 1919-1920. 




MABEL CATHERINE CASE, A.B. 

Instructor in English 

Certificate for Bible Work, English, 
and Expression, College of the Bible 
and Transylvania University, 1911; 
A.B., Atlantic Christian College, 1919; 
Present position, 1919-1920. 




17 




BONITA WOLFF, A.B. 

Instructor in Latin, French, and Expression 

Graduate in Expression. Atlantic 
Christian College, 1917; A.B., Atlantic 
Christian College, 1918; Present posi- 
tion — 




FANNIE MOYE 

Instructor in Mathematics 

A.B., Atlantic Christian College. 
1918; Teacher in Public Schools of 
North Carolina, 1915-1918; Present po- 
sition, 1919- 



18 



BENN J. FERGUSON 

Instructor in Commercial Subjects 

Concord State Normal, Athens, W. 
Va., 1887-1890; Graduate Commercial 
Department University of Kentucky, 
1891; Principal of Public Schools, 
Bondville, 111., 1891-1893; Graduate of 
Commercial and Shorthand Departments 
N. I. N. S., Valparaiso, Ind., 1894; Cer- 
tified Teacher, Phonographic Institute, 
Cincinnati, 0., 1895; Principal of the 
Shorthand Department M. S. B. C, 
Parkersburg, W. Va., 1898-1900; Grad- 
uate of Gregg's School of Shorthand, 
Chicago, 111., 1900; President Marietta 
Commercial College, 1900-1903; Gradu- 
ate of Zanerian Art College, Columbus, 
0., 1904; Graduate of Beckley Institute, 
Beckley, W. Va., 1917; A.B., Atlantic 
Christian College, 1919; Present posi- 
tion, 1919- 




NELLE M. KRISE, A.B. 

Instructor in History and Domestic Science 

Graduate of Beckley Institute, 1913; 
Graduate of Beckley Institute Normal 
School, 1915; Teacher of Public Schools 
in West Virginia, 1915-1916; Student of 
Home Economics, Columbia University 
Summer School, 1917; A.B., Atlantic 
Christian College, 1918; Present posi- 
tion, 1919- 




19 




C. C. WARE 

General Secretary and Field ff'orker 




AGNES PEEL 

Secretary to the President, and Bookkeeping 



20 



Mrs. H. W. GARNER 

Matron Mens Dormitory 




Mrs. JULIA ROSS 

Matron W omen's Dormitory 




21 




Ralph Smith, Senior Class Sponsor 



22 





23 



Senior Class Poem 



Once I sat in the twilight, 

Looking from my ivindow; 
At the oncoming darkness of night 

And the things that had shone in splendor. 

The wind was cold and shrill, 
As the sun's rays were passing away. 

All without was still; 

It seemed as the end of a perfect day. 

Looking into the shadows, 

Till they seemed to disappear; 
And then, o'erhanging the meadows, 

Was the sky so very clear. 

In the distance ivas an angelic form, 

As though a messenger oj Fate 
Coming with a task to perform, 

Or some story to relate. 

I looked again, and he was near — 

A herald with news to inform, 
An angel oj life with destinies to steer, 

That fortunes may not be forlorn. 

My heart I opened to my Heavenly Guest, 
And I listened to his message, too, 

Hoping that what he said would be best, 
And glorious and kind and true. 

This messenger of great surprise 

Came during my dream of silent longing; 

To brighten the horizon of my wishful skies, 
Directing my thoughts that came thronging. 

I fancied he opened a Book of Knowledge, 
A History of all that u'as ever done. 

Such a book I've never found in college, 
Telling of all that will ever come. 

Then I tried to think of something to ask 
This messenger, something I'd like to know. 

At once I thought about my College Class, 
Wondering into what each one should grow. 



Turning the leaves until finding the pages 

Where our future ivas recorded, 
He said, "From this class there shall be sages 

That some day will be rewarded. 

"All of you will be great leaders, 

And soar to realms sublime — 
Musicians, Teachers, Preachers, and Readers — 

As the ladder of life you climb. 

"Your work and tasks you have done in 
splendor, 
But you've not reached your goal; 
For there're great services that you must 
render, 
And great problems to unfold." 

Then he turned and soon was out of sight, 
As clouds disappear and new ones are born. 

Then, waking from my dreaming in the twi- 
light. 
It 'most seemed as 'twas early in the morn. 

Now, fellow-classmates, we launch from 
A.C.C., 
From scenes of happy days — 
Foundations builded strong trusting them 
to be, 
Able to stand firm in all our ways. 

Scene of college days where through much toil 
We struggled to master and have dominion 

O'er facts and truths not to be unfoiled, 
And not o'er things of mere opinion. 

To thee, Alma Mater, we say, Fareiuell. 

May thy halls stand up in our dreams. 
But, rising and flowing like water from a well. 

We must sail on — on down the streams. 

Memories of thee we'll ever keep through life; 

For, dear Alma Mater, we owe to thee 
Thy guidance in conflict and strife. 

So, Farewell to thee! Farewell to thee! 

Rupert A. Phillips. '20. 



24 




SELMA PERKINS, Expression 
Wendell, N. C. 

Selma came to us in 1918, and by 
"doubling" in Expression is enabled to 
graduate this year. She delights us all 
with her dramatic talent, and has won 
many friends by her sunny disposition. 
But she would have us all know that 
there is one Friend who stands above 
the rest in her affections. We do not 
blame but envy him, for surely she is 
one of those whom the gods kissed, 
saying: 

"Thou art jair, my child." 



ALETHIAN 

President of Dramatic Club. Vice-President 
of Athletic Association. Member of D. D. Club. 
Secretary of Y. W. C. A. Secretary of Junior 
Class. Vice-President of Alethian Literary 
Society. Wit Editor of The Pine Knot. 
Writer of "Last Will and Testament" of Senior 
Class. 




25 




ALETH1AN 

Vice-President of Freshman Class, 1916. 
Chaplain of Alethian Literary Society, 1917. 
Student Bethany College (Bethany, W. Va.), 
1918 and 1919. Member of Rechabite Club. 
Winner of Junior Oratorical Contest (Bethany 
College, April, 1919). Student University of 
North Carolina Summer School, 1919. Chap- 
lain of Alethian Literary Society, 1919. Ex- 
change Editor of The Radium, 1919 and 1920. 
Vice-Presidfnt of Senior Class, 1920. Business 
Manager of The Pine Knot, 1920. President 
of the Atlas Congenial Club. 1920. Class Poet. 
1920. 



RUPERT A. PHILLIPS, A.B. 
Macclesfield, N. C. 

A very young boy, known as just 
"Pert," came to us four years ago with 
high ambitions and undaunted courage. 
After having been with us two years, he 
spent his Junior year at Bethany College 
(Bethany, W. Va. ) , but returned to A.C. 
for his degree. He attended Summer 
School at the University of North Caro- 
lina in 1919. He is now ready to begin 
his chosen profession, the Ministry. 
Already he is holding "fourth time" 
pastorates for the Christian churches at 
Wendell, Red Bank and Walstonburg, 
N. C. 

". . . and still the wonder greiv 

That one small head could carry all he knew." 




26 




ALETHIAN 

Secretary of Senior Class. Pianist for Ale- 
thian Literary Society, 1917 and 1919. Secre- 
tary of * 2 T Sorority. 1919. Pianist for Y. W. 
C. A., 1919. Expression Editor of The Pine 
Knot, 1920. Class Prophet, 1920. 



LOTTIE WILSON, Expression 

Wilsons Mills, N. C. 

In '17 Lottie hailed from Wilsons Mills, 

And full many a heart she has given thrills. 

Many a note has been in the air, 

That in Music and Expression none could 
compare. 

Lottie, I say, surpasses in Expression, 

Studious and gay, and never in suppression. 

When Moye comes by she always hails, 
But in her classuork she never, never fails. 



Just what the future holds in store for 
her is a mystery as yet. Her talents lie 
in several directions. She may be a 
great musician. For three years while 
here she has specialized in this as well 
as in the art of Expression. She is so 
musical in her temperament that we 
were all surprised when she decided to 
major in Expression. We know that she 
will continue to cultivate her musical 
talents as well as her talents in Ex- 
pression. 




27 




LAWRENCE MOYE, A.B. 

Farmville, N. C. 

Lawrence entered A.C.C. in 1916. His 
earliest joy was to play "drop the hand- 
kerchief" with the girls or to take his 
place in playing "leap-frog" with the 
boys. 

He thinks twice, but then speaks 
quickly, and woe be you if you hear not 
or fail to obey. He is self-confident and 
determined, and has won the love and 
admiration of the students and faculty. 

"He who is firm and resolute in will, 
moulds the world to himself." 



ALETHIAN 

President of Freshman Class. Secretary of 
Alethian Literary Society, 1916-1917. Vice- 
President of Aletliian Literary Society, 1917- 
1918. President of Alethian Society, Spring 
Term, 1919. and Fall Term, 1919. President of 
Tennis Club. 1920. President of Junior Class. 
Editor of Pine Knot, 1920. President of 
Senior Class. * E T 




28 




ADA GREY DIXON, Voice 

Farmville, N. C. 

"Grey" loves to stay at A.C.C. She 
came to us when she was quite a little 
girl and has been "brought up in the 
way she should go." She had been here 
nearly a year before her wonderful voice 
was discovered, and it has been a con- 
stant source of pleasure ever since. 

"A voice so thrilling ne'er was heard 
In springtime from the cuckoo-bird." 



ALETHIAN 

Secretary and Treasurer of Tennis Club, 
1916-1917. Secretary of Phi Sigma Tau, 1918- 

1919. President of Phi Sigma Tau. 1920. Class 
Historian, 1920. Music Editor of Pine Knot, 

1920. * 2 T 




29 




ALETHIAN 

Student Shenandoah Collegiate Institute, 
1901-1903. Student of Industrial Christian 
College, 1908-1912. Principal of I. C. C. 1912- 
1916. Pastor of Christian Church, Roberson- 
ville, N. C, 1916-1920. Ministerial Editor of 
The Pine Knot, 1920. 



JAMES MACK PERRY, A.B. 
Robersonville, N. C. 

Perry is one of the "Old Boys" among 
us. However, we will not say how old. 
Anyway, he began his education in the 
days of the Blue-back Speller. After he 
had absorbed the limited curriculum of 
his home school, he went to Shenan- 
doah Collegiate Institute to continue the 
good work. Here, we are told, he was 
a star baseball player, but, like "Billy" 
Sunday, he had higher things in view, so 
refused to follow the game and took up 
the ministry. He now holds a Diploma 
in Music and a Ph.B. But he says his 
ambition has been a degree from A.C.C. 
He has quite a reputation as an evangel- 
istic singer. He marries, buries, preaches 
hard and fiddles in his own church or- 
chestra at Robersonville. We have great 
hopes for his further success after leav- 
ing A.C.C. 

"Build thee more stately mansions, my soul, 
As the swift seasons roll." 




30 



Class History 



Years, years, and years ago, it seems to us now, as we look back over the busy but 
happy years of our college life, we see the rugged and steep places that were ours to 
climb. 

In September, 1916, we entered the halls of A.C.C. for our college career. On 
this day they watched us, an aggregation of green, awkward country boys and girls, 
file into the President's office to enter our names as Freshmen upon the roll-book of 
A. C. College. Here day after day for four long years to pass under the rod of 
discipline that we might get "Wisdom and Understanding." We soon, however, took 
up our regular round of school work, and nothing of importance happened until 
Commencement. We were only too glad to see that day dawn, and I must admit that 
we had been counting the days — yes, even the hours — before we would leave. 

As vacation drew to a close we were surprised to find our thoughts eagerly 
wandering back to A.C.C, and we wouldn't even admit to ourselves that we were 
nervously counting the days until we should all be back again. And soon we met 
our old friends of the campus. After the tiresome days of matriculation were over, 
and work began in earnest, we gladly welcomed Lottie into the fold, and she has 
shared with us our joys and sorrows. 

On September 10, 1918, the Wheel of Time made its round and we found our- 
selves again at college as Juniors. We had Selma to join the happy throng. She 
couldn't share the days of Sophomorism with us, the days of joy and sorrow; but their 
failures and triumphs flicker alike in the dim past. The Junior year was a happy one. 
Six ambitious girls and boys embarked with the songs of victory upon Junior seas. 
We attended meetings regularlv, and even in the enthusiastic and warm debate, Time 
itself cannot erase their memory. 

We reported back to duty on time this year to begin our year's work with new 
courage. We number only six, yet we have strong determination and stout hearts. 
So the Senior year found six of us marching along together. Lawrence, Rupert, 
Lottie, Selma, Mr. Perry, and Ada Grey. We have had our trials, as all other Seniors 
have. It is needless to recall to you the things we've done or the record we shall leave 
behind us, but our class has never been surpassed — we think. 

We appreciate the helpful spirit shown us by the faculty, and have tried very hard 
to follow the good advice they have given us. 

As the session comes to a close, we realize more fully what must be in store for 
us when we reach the goal which we are putting forth our utmost efforts to attain. 

Lives of Seniors all remind us 

We should do our level best; 
And, departing, leave behind us. 

Records that will help the rest. 

A. G. D. '20. 



31 



Senior Song 

(To the tune oj "Girl of Mine") 

There was a Senior Class at A.C.C. 

Composed of just two-times-three. 

This Senior Class was very brilliant, too. 

We thought we knew it; 

So we went to it. 
It makes no difference if we're young and gay; 
We just have to be that way. 
We're sorry that the time has nearly come, 
But we can't possibly look glum. 

Chorus: 

It's true we hate to go from a place that is so dear. 
It is our Alma Mater; ive've loved her year by year. 

You know not how we love you; 

Our chums and faculty, too. 
We leave with hearts filled with grief and joy, 
We wish success to every girl and boy. 

It's noiv the time of parting. 

Farewell to old A.C.C! 

We've traveled o'er the steep and rugged ways, 

But you see it always pays. 

We've reached the goal that we've been striving for, 

We are not through, tho' ; 

Do you not think so? 
There'll be more struggles we'll have to go through; 
They may come to you and you, 
And if you come to our old A.C.C, 
The lighter they will seem to be. 

Chorus. 



32 



Senior Class Prophecy 



It was one of those warm, dreamy, perfect days in May when the whole earth 
seems hushed to silence. The snowy clouds were restless with happiness; the skies 
were too blue to keep their distance, and Heaven seemed to press its lips to Earth in 
one slow, solemn kiss. King Sun, on his throne, nestled in that vast expanse of 
blueness, peeped down through the tall, stately pines on the campus of A.C.C. right 
through the window of room number eight in the girls" dormitory and, with his num- 
berless tiny beams, teased, tormented, tortured, and finally dared me to leave studies 
and cares behind for awhile and steal away into the cool restfulness of the nearby 
wood. 

It had fallen to my lot to write the prophecy for the Senior Class of 1920, and I 
had been waiting for days for some kind of inspiration, but it seemed that nothing of 
that nature was coming to help me out of the difficulty. 

As I slipped out of the dormitory and stole from the campus I entrusted all my 
cares and troubles to those antique, vine-covered buildings and graceful, statelv pines 
that have for years spread their protecting arms over the heads of care-free and happy 
students. As I saw all these fading in the distance, and when at last the topmost peak 
of the tower disappeared, I gave a sigh of relief and felt that — for a little while at 
least — a great load had been lifted from my shoulders and I was really going to live. 

As I entered the wood its freshness and beauty awakened within me something 
that had for weeks and months been asleep, and as my eye was caught by each new 
beauty my heart gave one great throb of ecstasy and I ran — actually ran — on and on 
deep into the very heart of this new world of loveliness, drinking in its rich natural 
beauty with every step. Here and there dainty little blossoms peeped from out the soft 
mantle of grass that overspread the ground and turned their delicate faces, still spark- 
ling with dew, up to greet the tiny beams of sunlight as they picked their way through 
the dense foliage and danced and capered bewitchingly. Clustering vines besprinkled 
with myriads of delicate fragrant blossoms fringed the brink of the limpid stream, 
flowing across snow-white sands. Busy little birds paused a moment to take their 
morning plunge in the crystal waters and chirped and warbled unceasingly. The 
breezes, saturated with the odor of unfolding blossoms, rustled among the leaves and 
petals, kissing all into a state of enchantment. 

On and on I wandered: listless; heedless of time and distance; just merely 
living — living — and worshiping at the shrine of Nature. 

Unconsciously I turned and looked to the left, and there, not more than fifty yards 
away, was the mouth of a sort of cave yawning at me. A little to one side of the 
entrance was an immense cauldron suspended by a heavy chain from a tripod. The 
fire underneath it was crackling furiously and the contents of the cauldron were 
bubbling over the edge and sending up a pale, thin stream of smoke. Just a few feet 
away, huddled on a little stool, was a tiny, queer-looking old woman, dressed all in 
black. She wore a conical-shaped hat which extended two or three feet in the air, 
and a large black bat, with its wings extended, peacefully reposed on the extreme end. 
This little woman seemed absolutely unconscious of everything that was going on 
around her. She sat with her chin in her palms, silently gazing in the fire. Some- 
thing seemed to draw me to this little witch, and as I approached she lifted her head 
and said: 

"Well, you have come at last, I see. I was waiting for you." 

She motioned me to a seat on the mossy knoll. As she stirred the liquid in the 
cauldron a huge black cat came slowly and silently out of the cave and curled up 
beside me on the grass. The little witch resumed her watchful position. With her 
chin in her palms and with lids half closed she gazed at me with her keen black eyes. 
I did not feel inclined to speak, for everything was so mysteriously silent. A 

33 



peculiarly fragrant odor filled the air, and, feeling very strange, I leaned against a 
rock. For a moment I found myself looking steadily at the blue stream of smoke 
coming from the cauldron. Then, suddenly, instead of the smoke, I saw a jungle. 
Huge reptiles were crawling here and there. In the water near alligators were sunning 
themselves. Monkeys and snakes were swinging from every tree. A hippopotamus 
stuck his head from out a mass of reeds and vines, but hastily retreated as he saw a 
band of natives approaching. The black, savage-looking creatures seated themselves 
on the ground, nodding to each other. One of the most hideous of the males pointed 
to the left and spoke to the group. I looked in the direction he indicated and saw a 
white man approaching. He was slender and supple and swung along with an easy 
stride that caught my eye at once. Where had I seen that walk before? The bent 
head, the determined air — all looked strangely familiar. As he came up the natives 
bowed themselves to the ground. He opened the book which he was carrying, and I 
saw on the front in letters of gold, "The Holy Bible." He began to read, and as he 
lifted his face I recognized Rupert Phillips — older, of course, but still the same. 

The scene vanished, and once more I saw only the pale blue smoke ascending 
heavenward and the little witch silently nodding her head. I sat up and rubbed my 
eyes. What did this mean? '"Pert," of all people, a missionary in Africa! I looked 
at the little witch, but she was still looking in the smoke, so I said nothing but 
looked, too. 

Then — I saw a neatly furnished breakfast room. The steaming breakfast looked 
very tempting, and presently the door opened and a very comfortable looking creature 
entered, clad in tea gown, boudoir cap, and room slippers. This creature was not the 
mother of the household, as one would suppose, but the father. He seated himself at 
the table and proceeded to pour the coffee, while his wife took her place and glanced 
at the headlines of the morning paper. She was dressed in a smart dark-blue coatsuit 
with collar and tie. She also wore a dark sailor and her gloves and cane were within 
easy reach. Apparently she was ready for work. 

"Dearie," she said in a firm, steady voice, "my lecture for the suffrage meeting is 
scheduled promptly at ten. I suspect vou'd better hurry." 

As her husband served her in the daintiest fashion possible, she bestowed a very 
grateful smile upon him, and it was then I saw that this woman of business was 
Selma Perkins. 

Once more the scene vanished and only the thin stream of smoke could be seen. 

Again : I saw an overcrowded opera house. Evervone in the audience was 
leaning forward and eagerly watching and waiting. At last a figure appeared in full 
dress and at sight of him a roar of applause burst from' the audience. He came 
forward unhesitatingly and smiled graciously at his audience. The accompanist 
played the opening bars and a deep, rich, full voice filled the room. As he sang the 
audience was moved to smiles and then to tears. This was not a song; it was more 
than a song; it was the throb of a soul. He sang the selection through, and as the 
melody died away the enraptured crowd held its breath to catch the last lingering note 
of the enchanting refrain. When the last faint echo had gone the audience went wild 
with applause. Who was this genius that swayed the audience at his will and whose 
voice was far superior to even that of Caruso? As he made the last bow and was 
about to pass out of sight it dawned upon me that this calm, self-possessed air and 
steady look could belong to no one but Lawrence Moye. 

This scene vanished as did the others, and I found myself wondering why 
Lawrence had given up the study of medicine and was devoting his life to this line of 
work, when the little witch said suddenly, "Look!" 

I looked and saw an immense automobile gliding around the foot of a mountain. 
The lines were long and straight and it was so highly polished it was almost dazzling. 
Across the front of the radiator in prominent letters was "The Proctor." The car 
came to a standstill and I could distinguish two figures, both on the front seat. The 

34 



driver stopped the engine and then opened the door for the other to alight. To my 
astonishment I saw that the driver was a girl. She wore a dark tan suit. The skirt 
was extremely short and the dark tan leggins extended to the knee. Her cap matched 
the suit perfectly. After examining the car thoroughly, the two sat on the fender, 
facing me. As they looked through what I supposed to be illustrated booklets of the 
car I caught these words from the girl : 

"The Proctor has greater endurance, ninety-five per cent more power and mechan- 
ical simplicity than any other car on the market. It has no rival. Hundreds of 
Proctors within the past six months have undergone long, grueling, cross-country 
drives with honor. They have passed over great hill drives and long mountain climbs, 
ploughed through mud and washouts and desert sands where other cars stall and stop. 
During my experience as saleswoman I have sold the 'Jones,' the 'Lappin,' and the 
'Randolph.' but none have the power of endurance, the dependability, that the 'Proc- 
tor' has. You say you'll take the car?" 

I looked at this girl more closely, and to my astonishment I found her to be 
Ada Grey Dixon. 

As this scene passed away I settled myself more comfortably and waited. I 
knew that Mr. Perry was already a great minister, and I wondered what more the 
future held in store for him. 

A great throng of people suddenly appeared in the smoke and I looked more 
closely to see where they were going, for they all seemed to be headed in the same 
direction. It was night and all the streets were brilliantly lighted. At last I saw 
their destination and the people were fairly pouring in. Over the entrance, in great 
letters, which came and went with the flash of the many-colored lights, were these 
words: "The Super Adorable Theater." Great posters were on the outside which 
read: "Charlie Chaplin and Fatty Arbuckle Today" "Shown Here Wednesday, The 
World's Greatest Dramatist, Edith Tickleback." The manager of this theater strutted 
around with his hands in his pockets and a smile of supreme satisfaction radiated 
from his face. As he came up and spoke to an elderly lady and showed her the 
entrance I saw that this man was Mr. Perry. I was more than surprised at this 
glimpse into his future, and I sat in wide-eyed wonder, anxious, yet almost afraid, to 
see my own fate. I sat for several minutes in silence, waiting, wondering, and when 
still nothing more appeared I turned a disappointed, questioning face to the little 
witch. She was apparently very much amused, and when she saw my astonished look 
she held her thin little sides with both hands and rolled off the little stool, uttering 
peal after peal of laughter. At last she recovered her composure and patting me on 
the head she said: 

"Little lady, that's all." 

L. W. '20. 



35 



Last Will and Testament of Class 1920 

We, the Senior Class of 1920. noting that our time of sufferance is drawing to its close and that 
we must leave this beloved institution for parts unknown, being of sound mind (or at least we think 
so), do declare this to be our last Will and Testament: 

Item I. We bequeath to the Junior Class our Education books, so that under Professor Grim's 
careful instruction they may attain the 100 per cent Seniority that we have. 

Item II. To Miss Myrtie Harper, Ada Grey's love letters to assort and send home. 

Item III. To Dean Smith, an electric register, by which she can ascertain who is coming in and 
going out. 

Item IV. To Miss Chapman, a studio on the remotest corner of the campus, so she may prac- 
tice all she wishes. 

Item V. To Miss Ivy Mae Smith, our best wishes that she may train Mary Moore and Elsie 
Harris to practice as diligently as Ada Grey and Lottie. 

Item VI. To Miss Moye, Elsie's rouge box. 

Item VII. To Miss Brothers, a magazine, that she may remain peacefully at home in the 
evening. 

Item VIII. To Messrs. Hilley and Case, a permanent apartment. 

Item IX. To Mrs. Ross, a private telephone. 

Item X. To Miss Krise and Mr. Brabec, an electric percolator. 

Item XI. To Mr. and Mrs. Grim, a cozy nook on the campus for them to enjoy on spring days. 

Item XII. To Miss Wolff, one royal June wedding. 

Item XIII. To Gladys Foust, a violin student that will come on time. 

Item XIV. To our Alma Mater, our sincere appreciation and wish for her untold success in 
future years. 

Item XV. To the Y. W., a full attendance every Sunday evening. 

Item XVI. To Battle Tomlinson, the privilege of going up town any hour he wishes. 

Item XVII. To Anna Moore, Selma's roommate, Christine Whitley, that she may enjoy Senior 
privileges next year. 

Item XVIII. To Marion Brinson, Lawrences calm dignity. 

Item XIX. To Kathlyn Jackson. Lottie's changeable disposition. 

Item XX. To Mabel Lynch, the privilege of granting permissions. 

Item XXI. To Professor Meadows, a wig from the Seniors of the Expression Department. 

Item XXII. To the Athletic Association, success ever. 

Item XXIII. To the Bell Ringer, one holiday out of every week. 

Item XXIV. To the Student Body, April's Fool Day. 

Itcni-XXV. To the next Business Manager of the Pine Knot, Rupert's diligence and business 
ability. 

Item-XXl I. We hereby appoint Mildred Wilson sole executrix of this our last Will and 
Testament, said executrix to furnish all funds necessary for the execution of this will. 

In testimony ivhereoj. we have hereunto set our hands and seals this eleventh day of February, 
one thousand nine hundred and twenty. 



(Signed) 



Selma Perkins. 
Rupert A. Phillips. 
Lottie Wilson. 
Lawrence A. Moye. 
Ada Grey Dixon. 
James M. Perry. 



36 




37 



The Argonauts 



A ship was put in readiness 

Just three short years ago; 

To sail a trackless ocean 

And fight an unnamed foe, 

To drive the foe, if need should be. 

From off this rough and misty sea. 



IV. 

Each day, each week, a stranger foe 

Presents itself to view, 

To test the strength and skillfulness 

Of these, that valiant feiv, 

Who man the ship they love so dear. 

At any time, though death be near. 



II. 

The crew ivas small but willing 

To sail this sea of life, 

To contest any rival 

That entered in the strife; 

For all the members of this creiv 

Lived by the motto, Die or do. 



So on and o'er life's high ivaves 
The ship has forced her way, 
Striving, fighting, all the more 
Until the final day, 
When crew shall lay all armor down 
And each receive a victor's crown. 



III. 

Into the mist the good ship steered, 
Though foes were thick and strong, 
But from the lips of this brave crew 
Rang out the victor's song. 
'Twos heard by all, both far and near. 
On sailed the crew that knew no fear! 



VI. 

What is this ship whose flag floats high 

And conquers e'er she goes? 

Who is this brave and valiant crew 

That o'ercomes all her foes? 

You see her now, she's fought and ivon, 

The Senior Class of Twenty-one. 

J. B. T. 



33 





A. C. MEADOWS 

Lynchburg, fa. 

Alfred came to us this year from 
Lynchburg I Va. I , and has been quite 
an addition to our class. We find him a 
preacher and a high school principal 
and a diligent student, though at times 
he has a way of ''getting through" while 
others would fail. His college spirit is 
exemplary and is characteristic of him. 
If nothing prevents, he will receive his 
merited degree next year. 

"So, he gowned him. 
Straight got thy Heart, that book to the last 
page: 

Learned we jonnd him" 



MABEL LYNCH 

Dunn, N. C. 

No one can take the place of Mabel. 
Thank you. Dunn, for sparing her. Com- 
ing from our first chapel exercise in the 
fall of '17, the question was rushed 
among the old students "who is the tall 
brunette wearing a red sweater?" Every 
one wants to know her; she is the girl 
for the occasion. The "Y. W.," the Hes- 
perian Literary Society, the different 
committees, and all social enterprises 
have found that she means success. 
Through the week her promptness, her 
diligence, and her quietness prove her 
a student; while at a Saturday night 
social her inimitable smile, her beaming 
eyes, and her comely air reveal her a 
"general respected and admired by all 
her forces." Her own ideals and her 
esteem by others make her partially en- 
vied, but fully admired and loved by all. 
If originality, if keen intellect, and if a 
strong personality mean anything, then 
Mabel will mean something in the fu- 
ture. To know her is to love her. 



39 





J. BATTLE TOMLINSON 

Wilsons Mills, N. C. 

"If aught of prophecy be mine, 
Thou uilt not live in vain." 

Although Battle is accused of being a 
bit conceited, he is liked by everyone. 
One of his prominent characteristics is 
the art of doing things with apparently 
no effort. As his poetry has already- 
attracted attention, we are predicting for 
him a brilliant future. 



KATHLYN JACKSON 

Washington, N. C. 

Kathlyn's name has dwindled to 
"Kat" since she came to us three years 
ago. She is faithfully pursuing the 
much coveted A.B. degree. In all col- 
lege activities we find in her an ardent 
supporter. 

"No better expression of character 
then this, 'a smile.' " 



40 





MARION B. BRISON 

Arapahoe, N. C. 

Marion is all to the good! He is one 
of the most popular boys in college, and 
is especially liked by the girls. He is 
also a true optimist — staying happy 
himself and making other folk that way. 

"He had a head to contrive, a tongue to 
persuade, anil hand to execute." 



ANNA CULLENS MOORE 

Rural Hall, N. C. 

"None knew her but to love her, 
None named her but to praise." 



After learning her A B C's in the 
graded school at Rural Hall, Anna came 
to us in 1917 to crowd into four short 
years what most students are proud to 
accomplish in five. She has a fondness 
for candy, especially the "Lemon" va- 
riety, and as for pets she favors the 
"Wolff." 



41 




GLADYS FOUST 

Wilson, N. C. 

Gladys came to us in the fall of 1916 
with numerous talents to develop. Al- 
though she is a town pupil, she gives 
much of her time to student activities. 
She excels in Mathematics, charms us 
with her violin, and displays her artistic 
temperament in many striking posters 
and cartoons, for truly 

"Thought and Affliction, Passion, Hell itselj. 
She turns to iavor and to prettiness." 



42 



History of Junior Class 

In view of the fact that we are dignified Juniors, and will take the distinguished 
place of the Seniors next year, we feel that the history of our class should be known. 
It isn't to be a long one, but it is very important. 

In our Freshman year we were one of the best all-round classes that had ever 
entered A. C. College. There were not less than twenty-five of us (green as grass, I 
must admit I, but full of pep and college spirit. It seems that many of that class 
were full of nothing more than pep and college spirit; for when examination papers 
were given back some of the grades made on trigonometry and French made us realize 
to the fullest extent that we were thoroughly "Fresh." In spite of all that the Sopho- 
more Class of 1918 and '19 had twelve members. We had found out in our first year 
that college life was a great deal more than fun; so we came back with a motto, 
"Over the Top," ringing in our ears. Very little was accomplished the first half of 
our Sophomore year, for the time was divided up equally between the S. A. T. C. boys 
and the influenza; but during the second half we strove to bring out the best that was 
in us. And at the end we won. Our class today has only seven members; but what 
members! As fine a bunch of students as ever entered the halls of A. C. College. 
All seven members have worked diligently throughout the whole year, and have taken 
the leading parts in all athletic, religious and social affairs of the college. In the 
debating contest to be held between the two societies, out of the six debaters, three of 
them are from our class. This goes to show our ability along that line. The 
President of our Y. W. C. A., Mabel Lynch, and Editor-in-Chief of The Radiant, 
Marion Brinson, also come from the Junior Class. 

"Watch us win!" We are all coming back next year, prepared to do a much 
harder year's work than at any time before. We have come to realize to the fullest 
extent what one has to tread through before he reaches the top rounds of success. 
Our aim is to make the Class of 1921 the very best class that has ever left Atlantic 
Christian College and "Watch us win!" 

Kathlyn Jackson, Historian. 



43 




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47 



Sophomore Class 

Colors: Green and White. Flower: Kilarney Buds. 

Motto 

''The man worth while is the man that can smile 
when everything goes dead wrong." 

Mary Irma Moore President 

Annie Christine Whitley Vice-President 

Grady Spiegel Secretary-Treasurer 

Roll of Members 

Brinson, Lloyd Thompson Moye, NellE Whitehead 

Galloway, Mabel Elizabeth Spiegel, Grady 

Moore, Mary Irma Whitley, Annie Christine 



48 




49 



Sophomore Class History 



Never more proudly did the Freshman colors float over the college campus than 
when the "Freshies" poured forth in September, 1918. There were about forty of us 
to furnish jokes for all the college and all the society papers. We knew well that the 
first day of April was the most appropriate time to "cut" "Freshman English" and 
"Freshman Math." In spite of the fact "Flu" and the abnormal conditions resulting 
from the presence of the S.A.T.C., somewhat abated the usual college spirit, we made 
our influence and special talents recognized; for it was from our class that the left- 
fielder for the baseball team, the captain for the basket-ball team, and the mess ser- 
geant for the S.A.T.C., were chosen. In keeping with the abnormal times, it was only 
logical that this class, as a whole, should go on record as having led all previous 
Freshman classes of the institution in thorough work, in athletics, and in leadership. 

In September, 1919, only seven of us were fortunate enough to return for matricu- 
lation. Early in October we met and effected a class organization, with the following 
enthusiastic members as officers: Mary Irma Moore, President; Annie Christine 
Whitley, Vice-President, and Grady Spiegel, Secretary-Treasurer. The other four 
members are Bernice McLlwean, Lloyd Thompson Brinson, Mabel Elizabeth Galloway 
and Nell Whitehead Moye. Influenced by the fine record of last year, and stirred by 
the New World challenge for trained men and women, we entered this year with 
renewed ambition to follow the upward road. The basket-ball team, realizing this 
enthusiasm, reelected Lloyd captain. He was also chosen President of the Athletic 
Association. Two members of the class found places on The Radiant staff. Christine, 
better known as "Teeny," showed such literary enthusiasm and ability that she was 
elected President of the Alethian Literary Society for the second semester. We passed 
triumphantly all of our mid-term examinations. 

Our happy little band was broken at the beginning of the second semester, when 
Bernice was called suddenly home. This was a loss to the class; but, spurred on by 
the "ties that bind," we have determined to win such fame and honor as become 
Sophomores. Two members of the class are to help represent the Alethian and the 
Hesperian Literary Societies in the annual debate. Thus, with mingled joy and 
sorrow, success and failure, we have mounted two rounds of the ladder of education: 
we are reaching on and on toward the higher goal of '22, believing that "the best is 
yet to be." 



50 



Sophomore Class Poem 

Up! up! my friends, and quit your dreams, 

Or surely we'll not win. 
Up! up! my friends, and make your schemes, 

For we have webs to spin. 
The sun is high and still we loiter 

In the same indifferent way; 
While others seek the distant goal, 

Shall we do as they say? 
Up! Shall we not gird our armor strong. 

And increase our courage, too, 
While we work with a cheerful song. 

Showing them what we can do? 



Think! think! dear comrades so brave and true, 

Of things yet to be done. 
Think! think! of the rivers others swam through 

And the races they have won. 
They plunged in and down, down they went, 

Till they thought hope was gone; 
Then, when their courage was nearly spent, 

There gleamed a light, as at morn. 
Patience, courage — no one must these sell, 

Nor yet give them away; 
Necessary they are to run a race well, 

Tools for our use today. 

Now! now! let us up and be doing 

Each little task so well. 
Now! now! is no lime to be losing, 

Unless success we'd sell. 
So crowd in the fun and frolic and work — 

Tomorrow may be too late. 
For never a duty must we shirk, 

But go on at a steady gait. 
We'll be true to ourselves and set the pace 

And work ivith an end in view, 
And shoiv to the world with a smiling face 

W hat a bunch of Sophs can do! 

c.w. 



51 



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53 



Freshman Class 



Colors: Purple and Gold. Flower: Violet 

Motto : Love, Labor, and Laugh 

Officers 

William C. Manning President 

Ava Chula Wolff Vice-President 

Kate Bovven Secretary 

Helen Glenn Treasurer 

Olive Spear Poet 



Bo wen, Kate 
Glenn, Helen 
Hardee, Lena 

Manning, W. C. 



Roll 



Manning, J. C. 
Saunders, Inez 
Spear, Olive 
Wolff, Ava 



54 




55 




09 



56 



Freshman Class Poem 



Ring! Ring the bells that all may know, 
Tell the news where er you go. 
Let everyone be happy and gay. 
Thrilling with joy in work or play. 
But why should all so happy be? 
To welcome the Class of '23. 

Love! Love! Oh Class of '23, 

Love thy brother, and willing be 

To lend a hand to young and old, 

While steadily watching the shining goal. 

But why should "Love" your motto be? 

Because you've promised, Oh '23! 

Work! Work and show what you can do; 
Labor and Love the whole day through. 
Strive for the best, nor be content 
U ith less than the best when the day is spent. 
But why should "Labor" your motto be? 
Because you've promised. Oh '23! 

Laugh! Laugh, and others will happy be; 
Smile when the way you cannot see. 
Laugh and be happy, joyous and gay. 
Cheering others along Life's way. 
But why should you laugh and happy be? 
Because you've promised, Oh '23! 

"Love, Labor, and Laugh.' that all may know 
The Class of '23 where'er it go. 
This motto before you always keep, 
Whether on the heights or in valleys deep. 
"Love, Labor, and Laugh" let your motto be, 
Oh '23! Oh '23! 



Olive Spear, Class Poet. 



57 




Biology Class 




Physics Class 



58 



Ififtgps 




Third and Fourth Year High School 



Class Roll 



Elsie Harris 
Sybil Marie Heath 
Cleora Reid 
Sallie Adams 
Douglas Culpepper 
Tony Barnes 
Zeb Brinson 
D. Louis Smith 
Elizabeth Wiggins 
Mary Elmore 
Ada Grey Dixon 
Susie Dixon 
Nettie Noble 
Myrtle King 



Elva D. Moore 
Alma Stokes 
Louis Mayo 
Burnice McIlwain 
Thelma Proctor 
Annie Ruth Jones 
Sallie Walston 
Verna Belle Haskins 
Hillary Bowen 
Milton Moye 
Archie Reel 
Timothy Bowen 
Lewis Whitehead 
Roger Spear 



f.o 




61 



High School Class History 



When the nine-o'clock bell sounded on the morning of September 9th there came 
tripping across the campus from all directions a motley host. At first the observer 
thought of Coxey's Army, and then of John Brown's raid, but finally she settled on to 
the conviction that it was the "embryonic" Class of 1920. Later in the day these 
"students" were all busy pouring into the ears of the three members of the registration 
committee tales of their prowess in the Grades and Junior High. 

We also had many original and bright ideas which have since oozed out of our 
finger tips. 

Time does not permit us to tell with what misgivings we first rode a "pony" or 
tried a "cut," but practice in these arts soon brought us near to perfection. Surely it 
requires some training to know how to bluff the faculty, and "ad interim" we flunked 
disastrously. 

Now, as Senior, the common herd, as a whole, acknowledge our greatness; we are 
able to make the Freshies "bite the dust," the Sophomores "sharpen their wits on the 
grindstone," and the Juniors "acknowledge us the master mind." 

No Goddess of Mathematics, All-pervading Essence of Culture or Formulator of 
Rules and Regulations, has been able to inspire terror in our souls; even these, the 
so-called tyrants, have been forced to acknowledge our superior intellects. 

Some have failed on account of love affairs of plain "flunking," for in the affairs 
of the heart we have reigned supreme. Cupid has stolen into our flock and cast his 
dart through Thelma Proctor's flintlike heart. Though this is leap year, our boys as 
yet do not seem to have suffered. 

We cannot imagine what awful results will happen to all the activities when we 
are gone, but we hope that our example may inspire our successors to do the best they 
are able with their feeble efforts. 

When we consider the personnel of the class we realize that it is most fearfully 
and wonderfully made. 

It would, of course, require volumes to give the many achievements that have 
distinguished the different members of our class, but it will suffice to mention a few. 

Timothy Washington Bowen, an early native of Pinelown, or thereabouts, startled 
the natives with his unusual wisdom. He decided to come up to A.C.C. and impart 
this valuable information to the faculty, who now have seen fit to reward him by 
conferring upon him the honorary degree, P-h-i-z. 

Hillary Thomas Bowen, son of a Washington County farmer, was brought up 
among the corn rows, with the pumpkins. He developed poetitis when quite young, 
and was sent to A.C.C.H.S., where it was hoped he would be relieved of this malady 
by learning to sing. The result has been intense suffering for his fellowmen who live 
within earshot. 

Farmville, a little wide place in the road, down in Pitt County, is the home of 
two most bold and daring characters: Milton James Moye, noted for his astounding 
progress in geometry, and Ada Grey Dixon, famed for her heart-crushing record won 
during a six-year pilgrimage at A.C.C, where she has sung all her suitors into 
oblivion. 

62 



Way down in Pamlico County where they raise malaria and "taters," two of the 
most brilliant members of our class were born. One, Zebulon Ewart Brinson (not 
brimstone), on December 20th, in the latter part of the nineteenth century; the other, 
Archie Reel, on or about the Fourth of July, sixteen years before we went over and 
licked the Kaiser Bill. Both these boys are noted for their ability in biscuit slinging 
in the Boys' Dormitory. 

So modest and retiring that she hesitates to give any information so personal as 
her age, Nettie Noble came from Deep Run several years ago, and has meandered 
through these stately halls, storing away in her mature mind the knowledge that stale 
books and staler teachers would allow her to assimilate. 

Wilson has furnished us with two members: Charles Douglas Culpepper, born in 
1902, showed his superior mentality, like the poet Coleridge, by sitting alone and 
noticing things when he was four years old. His father runs a garage in order to 
furnish Doug with automobiles, which he uses to take Dean Smith and Jess Holliday 
for a spin on sunny evenings. And Myrtle May King, a winsome little lady who 
always did surpass every other member in her classes, has not failed even this year to 
demonstrate her intellectual ability in every branch of known and unknown study. 
But sorry to say she has so far failed to develop a love affair. 

Because of her congeniality, Verna Belle Haskins has become quite a favorite 
among all the girls at A.C.C. Since joining our class she has had many "knocks" but 
no "slaps," and, so far as her classmates know, she has "kept the even tenor of her 
way." Verna Belle hails from Kinston, N. C, a sister town of Wilson. 

Lewis Smith, the member of our class who does not have to ask for blessings but 
can reach up and take them, says that he was born in 1900 in Wilson County. Some 
thought him timid at first, and he may be, but he has succeeded in winning the atten- 
tion of Miss Mary Moore. 

Fannie Marie Batts, a member of our class, came to us since our Christmas holi- 
days from Whitakers High School, and has already won our affections by her 
winsome ways. 

Susie Mildred Dixon, a modest child, who received her early training at Hooker- 
ton, came this year to put on some finishing touches at A.C.C. She has already suc- 
ceeded in showing her special interest in mathematics, and probably will not always 
lead her classes, but also some day succeed her present teacher, Miss Fannie Harper. 

Mary Elizabeth Elmore says she was born in 1899, and came from way down there 
at the jumping-off place about ten miles from Goldsboro. She is naturally not very 
bright, consequently she works very hard to make her passing grades. No doubt she 
will convince the world, unless she has a husband, that Woman Suffrage is right. At 
any rate, she is preparing speeches to that effect already. 

We do not believe, as a rule in encouraging faculties to entertain any very exalted 
notions as to their importance, but in the present instance we gladly admit our debt of 
gratitude to those teachers who have worked so prodigiously to give us a good founda- 
tion of knowledge. And we realize that it is due, not to our own skill as climbers, 
but to the fact that they took us firmly by the shoulders when we slipped and dragged 
us bodily to safe ground, that at last we have attained this dizzy height from which we 
can occasionally glimpse, when the clouds break away, the promised land beyond 
Graduation Day. 

Mary Elizabeth Elmore. 



63 



Class Poem High School, 1920 



Before beginning this melreless rhyme, 

I'd like to take a bit of your time 

To thank you for the honor conferred on me — 

"Poet of the graduating class to be." 

And I hope my duty may do 

With credit to myself and honor to you. 

Poets are born, not made, 'tis said, 

But I am only a poet maid. 

And with the muse only slightly connected, 

So if my rhyme is bad it's only expected; 

You'll consider the source from whence it came, 

And remember I'm quite young at the poetry game. 

Now, just what a class poem should be 

Is a theme I'll admit is quite beyond me. 

But I guess of course it would be the right thing 

To wish you all the good that time may bring. 

But I'll follow the old and well beaten track 

And at each member of the class take a crack, 

And point out their faults and foibles to you. 

To start the thing off and get it to going, 

We'll begin with our President, Hilary Bowen. 

The next to whom I'll call your attention 

Is the good looking popular Zebulon Brinson. 

Tim Bowen is learning to preach and to spiel. 

But he'll never be as favored as Archie Reel. 

The sweet little wee bit of a boy 

Is the cute and smart Milton Moye. 

Douglas Culpepper and Louis If hitehcad 

Are the sports of the class, so 'tis said. 

How true this is we really don't know, 

But we'll leave them now and to the girls we'll go. 

And a sweeter lot can't be jound 

If you search the whole wide world around. 

The name that is most popular far and away 

Is that of Jess, for it's Holiday. 

Annie Ruth Jones is pretty, quiet, and good, 

And loved by all, so 'tis understood. 

Ada Grey Dixon is a Senior in Voice, 

And the sweet singer of the class by choice. 

Then there is Susie Dixon, 

She's as smart a girl as your eyes can "fix-on." 

'Tis a saying you have heard often before, 

Give one an inch they will want an "Elmore." 

So that is the way it is with all here 

Who have been with Mary at school this year. 

Miss Verna Belle Haskin is clever and cute, 

And is very popular, is college repute. 

Here are the favorites, to whom we take off our hats, 

Nettie Nobles and Fannie Baits'. 

In fact, this whole class has virtues most rare. 

And with the classes of yore most favorably compare. 

And we bid them God-speed on their journey of life — 

May they have all its joys and escape all its strife. 



Myrtle Mae King. 



64 



o 

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65 



First and Second Year High School 



Class Roll 



Ada Hardee 
T. Richard Rouse 
Joe 0. Hearne 
Margaret Lucile Eagles 
Nora Stallincs 
Maude Brown 
Nettie Bachelor 
Losker Bennett 
Nelson Broughton 
L. G. Darden 
Marie Chapman 
Nettie Wiggins 



Warren W. Campbell 
Tommie Elmore 
John B. Beland 
Alfred Hodge 
Russel Vick 
Bernice Tucker 
Ray Heath 
Hattie Delph 
J. W. Beland 
Rosa McKeel 
Mary Flowers 
Cleora Dixon 



Vera Tingle 



66 




67 




68 



Calendar 

September 

10. Arrival of students. Freshmen learn what it means to matriculate. 

11. '"Freshies," visited by upper classmen in the "wee sma' hours." decide to do the "shimmie" 

from fear of force. 
13. Y. W. gives "get-acquainted" social. 
15. Excitement of first Monday, with the pleasure of cleaning rooms and going to the "movies" 

once more. 
19. President's reception. "Everybody meets a-body." 
22. Alethian reception. 
25. Organization of boy's "Washing Club." 

27. Phi Sigma Tau Sorority gives a reception. Boys frightened by the formality. 

28. Hesperians entertain faculty and student body. 

29. Alethians clean campus. 

30. Grand discovery made — that September, 1916. had thirty-one days. 

October 

3. Alarm clock mars the solemnity of the chapel hour. 

5. Lloyd and Zeb do "spring cleaning." 

9. Club initiations. Many disfigured "Freshies" seen here, there, and everywhere. 

13. Boys introduce latest additions to their home. Many hearts stricken while drinking punch 

from "the old oaken bucket that hung in the well." 

17. Mr. Brabec guest at girls' "Dorm." 

24. Kate Bowen, "adorondating her body gearings assimilates" to her voice lesson. 

25. First musical tea; camouflaged stage-fright. 

26. "Left-handed" club organized: charter member among faculty. 

31. Ghosts, goblins and witches appear in frightful and beautiful costumes at girls* Hallowe'en 

party; new case. 

November 

3. Addition to "Left-handed" club. 

5. Amceba and Paramecium discovered in laboratory. 

7. Something radically wrong with furnace at girls' "Dorm." North Pole discovered. 
9. Fall millinery on display at church; much craning of necks. 

11. Holiday in commemoration of armistice. 

15. False fire alarm; much excitement. 
17. "Bluest of blue" Mondays. Classes. 
19. Wholesale celebration of birthdays. 

24. Baseball game between Hesperians and Alethians. Hesperians win. 
26. Most important event of season; Thanksgiving holidays. 

December 

1. Continual discussion of approaching vacation; much day-dreaming. 
3. A visit from Miss Heller. 

6. Midnight feast in No. 36. 

8. Boys shun store and "Hooverize" all pennies. 

13. Mock chautauqua: Mrs. Pankhurst and Charlie Chaplin, chief attractions. 

16. Famous Jordan ride. 

17. Midnight revelry in girls' "Dorm"; barnyard serenade; teachers overcome and roped in by 

students. 
19. One teacher at breakfast. Homeward bound. 



January 



2. Arrival of students to begin New Year. 

3. Everyone declares they have had the very best time of their lives. 
8. Day of doom. Exams begin. 

10. Another long breath. Exams over. 

69 



Calendar — Continued 

12. Boys decide Richard is desperately in love with Nettie Mae. 

13. Mr. Foust pays us a visit; best '"togs" on display — smiles from ear to ear. 

14. Wedding bells. "Left-handed" club loses a member. 
17. Dr. Smith at St. Louis. Few skip chapel. 

19. Atlas Congenial Club entertains. Pert extends hearty welcome. 

20. Numerous A.C.C. students attend Galli-Curci concert. 
26. Ice cream again ; much excitement. 

30. Mr. McLees delivers interesting address. 



February 



4. Roger and Susie found working "Math" together in class-room. 

6. Quarantined indefinitely. "Weeping, wailing, and gnashing of teeth." 
9. No "movies," no ice cream, no "nothing" but campus. 

10. No classes. College boys all smiles. Girls take advantage. 

11. Birthday party. Costumes varied. No boys. 

13. Unlucky day. Classes resumed. 

14. Leap-year proposals afloat. Mysterious Valentines arrive. 

18. Y. W. girls give "swell" dinner. Array of Parisian and Lucama style; fines paid good 

naturedly. 

22. Everybody forgot to say "I cannot tell a lie." 

29. Girls are wise enough to take advantage of the day, which will not occur again in four long 
years. 

March 

1. Spring comes in ''like a lion." 

5. Ada Grey and Mabel get their "daily." 

7. Nettie Nobles becoming desperate; wishes to move to the "Sandwich Isles." 

10. Elsie stays in bed all day, waiting for flowers which never arrive. 
13. No chapel. Nettie Mae continues her practicing. 

15. Kat, followed by Mrs. Smith, makes her daily rounds. 

17. Inter-society debate. Mexico hung in the balance; A.C.C. breathless! 
21. Quarantine lifted. "Flu has flown." 

28. Town boys come back — floating reception around campus. 

29. Every one requested to return all books and magazines (long past due) to library. 

30. Meeting of "S. B." club until midnight — interrupted by fire alarm — and Dean. 

31. No physical culture. 

April 

1. Good lessons! April fool!! 

3. "In spring a young man's fancy lightly turns to" — baseball. 

4. Easter Sunday. Everybody goes home and "dikes-out." 

8. Rumors of another quarantine — because of "spring fever." 

11. "Teenie" got a letter from Fuquay Springs. 

15. Raid on refrigerator in boys' "Dorm." 

16. Miss Chapman's recital; famous concerto finally rendered. 

19. Selma preaches what site's been practicing. 

21. Hilary treats his girls at Barnes'. 

23. Ada Grey sings last song at A.C.C; Lottie buries her recital numbers. 
25. Marion Brinson's ship comes in, named "Mary Anna." 

27. Self-denial Box emptied today. 

30. Last April showers. 

May 

1. Cramming from morn 'til eve. 

3. Rutabagas, onions, radish. 

4. Onions, radish, rutabagas. 

5. Radish, rutabagas, onions. 
8. Bill conquers Victor. 

10. Elementary musical recital. 

12. Excitement tense. 

13. Finals— ! ! ! ! - ? ? ? ? ?— !??'?! 

16. Baccalaureate Sermon; first appearance of caps and gowns. 

18. Dramatic Club presents wonderful play. 

22. Homeward bound ! "Tears, idle tears." 




71 



School of Music 



Ada Grey Dixon 
Mabel Galloway 
Jessie Holliday 
Kathlyn Jackson 
Olive Spear 
May Pollock 
Glady's Peel 
Annie Ruth Jones 
Kate Bowen 



Voice Students 



Hillary Bowen 
Mabel Glenn Meadows 
Nelle Moye 
Helen Griffin 
Nettie Wiccins 
Mary Wiccins 
Mary Walker 
Samuel Davis 
Nora Stallincs 



Blanche Wells 



Piano Students 



Mabel Galloway 
Lillian Chapman 
Mary Moore 
Elva Moore 
Blanche Stuart 
Bruce Ray Heath 
Christine Whitley 
Marcaret Lucile Eacles 
Nell Moye 

MaBel Glenn Meadows 
Nora Stallincs 
Ada Grey Dixon 
Burness McIlwaine 
Helen May 
Sallie Adams 
Annie Ruth Jones 
Lottie Wilson 
Ava Wolff 
Kate Bowen 
Olive Spear 
Annie Lee Walker 
Elsie Harris 



Verna Belle Haskins 
Jessie Holliday 
Max Miller 
Grace Holden 
Hillary Bowen 
Nettie Wiccins 
Elizabeth Wiccins 
Alma Stokes 
Helen Glenn 
Nettie May Batchelor 
Katharine Ware 
Francis Ware 
Edna Alphine 
Annie Harper 
Mary Harper 
Ermon Johnson 
Mary Williams 
Elouise Case 
Marion Smith 
Gladys Peel 
Pauline Granger 
Inez Saunders 



Violin Students 



Helen Glenn 
Sidney Willouchby 



Douglas Dunn 
Robert Jones 



72 




College Octette 

Standing, left to right — Ada Grey Dixon, Hillary Bowen, Mary Moore. M. B. Brinson, 
Mabel Galloway. 

Sitting, lejt to right — L. B. Brabec. Accompanist; Marie Brothers, Director: A. C. Meadows, 
Mabel Lynch, Perry Case. 



74 




Auditorium 




A.C.C. Orchestra 

First Violin, Conner FeltoN; First Violin. Gladys Foust; Second Violin, Helen Glenn; 

Flute, PiiOFF.ssoii Case; Cornet, Albert Ruffin; Clarinet, King; French Horn, A. C. Meadows; 

Drums, Jennings; Piano, Lillian Chapman; Director, Ivy May Smith 

75 



Glee Club 



Back Ron- — '"Kat" Jackson, Nell Move, Mae Pollock, Christine Whitley, Mabel Lynch, 
Lottie Wilson, Olive Spear. Helen Glenn, Ava Wolff. 

Second Row — Ada Grey Dixon, Elsie Harris, Miss Marie P. Brothers (Director), Mary 
Moore, Sallie Adams, Nettie Wiccins. 

Front Row — Mabel Galloway. Kate Bowen. 





77 




Chemistry Class 



78 



lubUcdttOTis 




79 



The Pine Knot Staff 

1. Lawrence A. Moye Editor in Chief 

2. Mable Lynch Literary Editor 

3. Marion B. Brinson Athletic Editor 

4. Selma Perkins Wit Editor 

5. Rupert Phillips Business Manager 

6. Kathlyn Jackson Society Editor 

7. A. C. Meadows Assistant Editor 

8. Gladys Foust Art Editor 

9. Hayes Parish Alumni Editor 

10. Anna Moore College Editor 

11. Lottie Wilson Expression Editor 

12. J. B. Tomlinson Asst. Business Manager 

13. J. M. Perry Ministerial Editor 

14. Ada Grey Dixon Music Editor 



80 




81 




The Radiant Staff 



1. Christine Whitley. Wit Editor 
2. Marion Brinson, Editor in Chiej 
3. Bonita Wolff, Alumni Editor 
4. Grady Spiegel, Business Manager 



5. A. C. Meadows, Literary Editor 
6. Mabel Lynch, News Editor 

7. J. Battle Tomlinson, Asst. Bus. Mgr. 
8. Rupert A. Phillips, Exchange Editor 



82 




Kxprj ss i on 



83 



The Changing of the Seasons 



Given by Physical Culture Class 



Spring 



Anna Moore 
Helen Glenn 
Ava Wolff 



Selma Perkins 
Summer \ Lottie Wilson 
Bonita Wolff 



[ Kate Bowen 
Autumn \ Sadie Greene 

Mildred Wilson 



I Mae Pollock 
Winter < Mary Moore 
{ Nettie Noble 



84 




85 



The Happy Day 

Cast of Characters 

Mrs. Marlowe Bonita Wolff 

Anne Loving Lottie Wilson 

Sybil Marlowe Selma Perkins 

Kitty Fern Mae Pollock 

Opal Neff Charlie Grey Rawlincs 

Mrs. Tatlock Nettie Noble 

Polly Tatlock Kate Bowen 



The Scheme That Failed 

Cast of Characters 

Paul Jennings Marion Brinson 

Victor Craven Lawrence Moye 

Edith Jennincs Lottie Wilson 

Fanny Selma Perkins 

Mrs. Craven Bonita Wolff 

Bridget Nettie Noble 



86 




The Happy Day 




The Happy Day 



87 



The College Dramatic Club 

In the fall of 1918 the Expression students of A.C.C. organized themselves into 
a cluh known as "The College Dramatic Cluh." Pink and Green were chosen as the 
club colors. 

During the year many delightful informal programs were given in the club-room, 
decorated for the occasion to carry out the color scheme. An hour of social enjoy- 
ment always followed these informal programs. At other times more formal pro- 
grams were given in the auditorium to large and attentive audiences. In the spring of 
1919 these plays appeared on some of the formal programs: 

The Obstinate Family; 

The Arrival of Penelope; 

The Superior Sex; 

The Proposal Under Difficulties. 

The plays and readings contributed by the club played a large part in the com- 
mencement program. 

During the winter and spring months of this year several miscellaneous programs 
have been given, and among the plays the following have been presented: 

The Happy Day; 
The Scheme That Failed; 
Local and Long Distance; 
Love of a Bonnet. 

Artistic drills have been given from time to time. Among them, The Changing 
of the Seasons. 

Two of the members of this club gave their Senior recitals in April and will 
graduate from the School of Expression in May. 



88 




Local and Lone; Distance 



Cast of Characters 

George Davis . Marion Brinson 

Miss Brown Mae Pollock 

Mary- Jones .... Charlie Grey Rawlings 

Mrs. Davis Lottie Wilson 

Mrs. White Kate Bowen 

Miss Slade Nettie Noble 

Kitty Parsons Selma Perkins 



89 



Business Class 



Class Roll 



Myrtle King 
Annie Lee Walkeii 
Lelia Perry 
Sallie Walston 
Mary Elmore 
Thelma Lynch 
Annie Nell Farmer 
Sadie Greene 
Mae Pollock 
Bertha Davis 



Margaret Overman 
John B. Beland 
Timothy W. Bowen 
Alfred Hodce 
Ruth Denny 
Mildred Wilson 
Weston Perry 
Benjamin Batts 
Warren Campbell 
Thomas 0. Elmore 



Helen May 



Officers 

John B. Beland President 

Thelma Lynch Vice-President 

Bertha Davis Secretary and Treasurer 

Motto 
The work of the world cannot be clone without us. 



Colors 
Green and Gold 



Flower 
Golden Rod 



Yell 

Zip-zap-zee, 
Busy as a bee. 
Business Class 
of A.C.C. 



90 




91 



B 



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N 




The College Alphabet 



is for Archie, a lad so neat. 

To hear him say lessons is really a treat. 

is for Brinson and Bennett, too; 

Though very different, they are both true blue. 

's for our College, our dear A.C.C. — 

How dear in these years it's becometh to me! 

May it live long and prosper, may the years bring it fame. 

And its sons and its daughters aye honor its name! 

is for Dixon, who sings like a lark; 

She prefers above all things a spot in the park. 

is for Elsie, who has a sweet smile; 

The paint on her face you can see it a mile. 

is for Ferguson, who brings us the mail; 
Though it rain or snow he never does fail. 

is for Galloway, who sings a sweet song; 
A certain man will claim her ere long. 

is for Hilary — though thoughtful and good. 

He'll do what you tell him if it's bring in the wood. 

is for Idleness as clear as can be; 
But you never can find it at A.C.C. 

is for James, who never is glum; 

You can hear him rejoicing when others are dumb. 

is for Kathlyn — her "pet name is Kat ; 
She positively says she won't wear a rat. 

's for Lawrence and Lottie, too. 

II il wasn't for each other what would they do? 

's for Mary — oh! a gay lassie is she; 

Makes a hit with the boys — just watch her and see! 

stands for the girl whom we know as Nelle; 
Not afraid of anything we've learned so well. 

is for Olive, she's tall and sweet; 

To see her look happy is really a treat. 



D is for Pollock- her first name is Mae; 

She has distinguished herself in a college play. 



Q 
R 



U 



stands for "quiz" and also for queer; 

The "quizes" are past, bat the queer are still here! 

is for Ray, a smart little girl; 

She gives you a smile and goes like a whirl. 

is for Sallie with a musical mind; 
More nimble fingers you never will find. 

is for Tingle — Vera, we mean; 

And also for Thelma. heard when not seen. 

is for Us — the ones left out; 

Who are already feeling slighted, no doubt. 

is for Verna Belle — h^re for a spell; 
We hope she performs her duty well. 



VL7 is for Whitley — for music she came, 
' And Faithfully always has practised the same. 

V.V.y Oh, now, who shall they be? 

*"•■!■ *^ Well, they may be you or they may be me. 

And now 1 have come to the end of my rhyme. 
And 1 know noli are thinking it's just about time. 

S. P. "20. 
92 




ATHLETICS 



93 




Baseball 

Louis Smith Douglas Culpepper 

Tony Barnes Bennie Batts 

Archie Reel Zebulon Brinson 

Battle Tomlinson Richard Rouse 

Lloyd Brinson Alfred C. Meadows 
William Manning 

H. S. HlLLEY Manager 

Sollie Winstead Coach 

A. C. Meadows Captain 



94 





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Boys' Basketball Team 

Forwards 
Lewis Whitehead Richard Rouse 

Center 
L. T. Brinson 

Guards 
Battle Tomlinson W. C. Manning 

Subs. 

M. B. Brinson Archie Reel 

Tim Bowen 



96 




97 



Athletics 



Athletics will go at A.C.C. Our college is young and has not yet 
been able to develop teams to cope equally with older and bigger 
colleges of the State. Then, too, our athletics has been stunned by the 
reluctance on the part of some to see the value in it. But it is now clear 
that physical endurance is the only safe basis for intellectual ability. 
This was recognized by the Greeks thirty centuries ago; the Olympian 
games, consisting of foot races, boxing and wrestling, were nationalized 
and held every fourth year; and Grecian youth never received a higher 
honor than the victor's crown at the contests. In Sparta, physical 
training reached a high pitch ; the lad endured the winter with but one 
shirt; took his night's rest on a bundle of river reeds; and went before 
the scourging master at regular intervals. We are not too proud to 
take a lesson from the ancients. We left last year expecting to play 
real games this year. On our return we felt that a damper had been 
turned on by the loss of Lappin. But soon we heard from Meadows; 
and his enthusiasm explained his bald head. Our boys and girls were 
called out and they rallied to the new leader. It was seen that we had 
talent; teams were picked; and real play began. So far (February, 
1920) our teams have brought home the laurels over half the time. 
Come back, old players, and enjoy the rally next year! Come on, new 
ones, and be in the fun! 



98 



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99 



A Midsummer Night Tragedy 



Not a long lime to come, I remember it well, 
Alongside a poor house a maiden did dwell. 
She lived with her father, her life was serene, 
Her age it was red, and her hair was seventeen. 

II. 

This maid had a lover who near by did dwell, 
A cross-legged ruffian and bow-eyed as well. 
Said he, "Let's fly by the light of yon star. 
For you are the eye of my apple, you are." 

Ill 

"Oh, no!" said the maiden; "be cautious and wise, 
My father will scratch out your nail with his eyes. 
And if you but love me, don't bring me disgrace!" 
Said the maiden, as she buried her hands in her face. 

IV. 

Then the bold lover knocked the maid, 
And cautiously drew out the knife of his blade. 
He cut the fond throat of the maiden so fair, 
Then dragged her around by the head of her hair. 

V. 

Then the fond father appeared to appear 
And gazed on that scene with eyes in his tear. 
He knelt down beside her, her fair face he kissed, 
Then he rushed his nose at the murder's fist. 

VI. 

Then the sad father said, "Villain, you bolt!'' 
He drew out a horse pistol, 'twas raised from a colt. 
Said the lover, "I'll die if I stay, it is true!" 
Said he. "Til fly!" and he flew up the flu! 

End. (Exit lover.) 



100 



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h]<rov£ =desus 

0€ov =*God 
Tlos = Son 

I0T r\ p = Saviour* 



^^^^^^^^^^^^M^^^^^^M^^^^^^M^ 



101 



The Fellowship Club 



Roll 

Raymond A. Smith President 

Prof. F. F. Grim Vice-President 

Hilary T. Bowen Secretary and Treasurer 

Timothy W. Bowen Prof. Howard S. Hilly 

Marion B. Brinson Alfred C. Meadows 

Losker Bennett Grady Spiecel 

Otto Henderson Charles C. Ware 

Prof. Perry Case J. E. Stuart 

Rupert A. Phillips 



The Fellowship Club is an organization of ministers and ministerial students 
connected with the college. It is an association for the purpose of having a closer 
fellowship with each other. In its meetings each week it is a part of our program to 
discuss the problems that each minister encountered on the preceding Sunday of the 
preceding week. A report of each one's work and accomplishments is made. A 
number of very good addresses by ministers from diilerent parts of the State have 
been given at our meetings. 



102 



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103 



Y. W. C. A. 

Motto 
'We can lead no one closer to Christ than we ourselves have been. 



Cabinet Members 

Mabel Lynch President 

Christine Whitley .... Vice-President 

Selma Perkins Secretary 

Kathlyn Jackson Treasurer 

Sibyl Heath Chairman Missionary Committee 

Ava Wolff Chairman Religious Meeting Committee 

Gladys Foust Chairman Publicity Committee 

Christine Whitley .... Chairman Membership Committee 

Mary Moore Chairman Finance Committee 

Anna Moore ...... Chairman Social Committee 

Francis Harper Advisory Committee 



Members 



Fracis F. Harper 
Mabel Lynch 
Christine Whitley 
Kathlyn Jackson 
Lucretia Henderson 
Ray Heath 
Sybil Heath 
Elvo Moore 
Olive Spear 
Mae Pollock 
Bernice Tucker 
Ada Grey Dixon 



Mabel Galloway 
Fannie Moye 
Sallie Adams 
Jessie Holiday 
Ava Wolff 
Anna Moore 
Helen Glenn 
Nell Moye 
Kate Bowen 
Lottie Wilson 
Selma Perkins 
Susie Dixon 



104 




105 



An Extract From 

The Clashing of Forces 

By J. M. Perry 

At the dawning of human history man emerges out of the shrouded night and 
mysterious, mantled shades of mysticism that lie just this side of that unfathomable, 
impregnable "in the beginning God created," and stages the introductory act before 
God's recording camera, leaves his never-fading impress on the canvass of time, dis- 
turbs the equilibrium of the mighty seismograph divinely tuned to the life of the 
world, and in his primitive struggle with the forces of evil discovers his self-insufli- 
ciency, falls before the sweltering blow of the beguiler's satanic power, and rises only 
when heartened by the comforting assurance that victory is born in defeat, on broader 
fields shall the battle be fought, a bruising, withering stroke shall foil the tempter's 
snare, and the seed of the woman shall break the poison fang and bruise the serpent's 
head. 

The omnipotent, omniscient, omnipresent, only one true, living and loving God, 
who slumbers not nor sleeps, is not forgetful ot the majestic image and divine likeness 
of His own creation, and before the "Father of Lies," "The Old Serpent, the Devil," 
the despotic, gloating assassin of the human race, can count his victim out, a com- 
passionate Father pulls the lever of His love, breaks up the fountain of His grace, 
and man stands again on the forum of hope in the arena of the world, rejuvenated by 
the embryonic stir of consciousness and the faint intimation of the prejudice and 
alliance of God on the side of humanity and against the formidable foe in tbe struggle 
of life, and though too far down the vista of centuries for adequate expression, he 
confidently hopes that the divine ultimatum shall be the appropriating of the bruises, 
wounds and stripes where they can most assuredly be borne — that love may find a way 
and make a compatible expiation. (Omnia vlncit amor.) "Love conquers all things." 

Whatever may be the conjecture as to the primitive intellectual and spiritual 
endowment or development of mankind and his ability to rise to such lofty anticipa- 
tions, no doubt can arise as to the foreknowledge and magnanimous purpose of the 
One whose image he bore. 

The long, devious paths from Eden to Calvary were outdistanced only by the 
providential certainty of the world's Redeemer, and in all the meandering vicissitudes 
of human experience God has been over all, the path and range-finder of the human 
race. Reverses have checkered the way. but their relative potentialities have rather 
sharpened the metal of the aspiring souls of men and militated to the upward stride 
and steady pull of civilization, true religion and Christianity. If the ebb has been as 
great as the flow, surely justice and mercy, love and divine truth have ever ridden on 
the crest of the wave. 

It is more than a passing coincidence that Moses, out of his limited experience 
and meek existence, should set the master minds of all ages in a furore and sink a 
shaft to the very tap-root of the "a priori" of the universe; and astronomers, geolo- 
gists, botanists, zoologists and biologists of the universities and laboratories of the 
world still oscillate around the pole-star of the flash of his pen. As God's great scribe 
he sounds a note on the first cause of things that is fundamental and indispensible to 
the faith of the world. Fundamental, because it serves as a bed-rock on which the 
whole fabric of revelation rests, and indispensable because it makes all subsequent 
scriptures intelligible. Its priority in time and material may account for the malign 
thrust of the destructive critic and the faithless gore of the infidel's dagger, and. 

106 



happily, perhaps, for the unswerving stand through the long black night of the Dark 
Ages by the heroic defenders of the faith. 

The armies in the field are by no means the most potent forces that be, but the 
agents of defense and aggression. They may be succeeding all along the line while 
the forces that made them be waning. Likewise, viewed from immediate results, the 
arch enemy of man would be the master of the world, for he won in the first great 
struggle; but it was a clashing of forces and not decided on the strength of the agent. 
It was Good against Evil, Infinite against Finite. Spirit against Flesh, Heaven against 
Hell. Divinity against Demon, and God against the Devil. 

The world marches on, keeping step to the discordant, clanking clashing, and 
however divergent has been the paths, the major forces intersect once more in the 
darkness of Gethsemane. The forces of evil strike hard at the signal war-whoop of 
the traitor within. The cross they uplifted became the standard of the world. While 
they wrote. "Jesus of Nazareth, King of the Jews," the bodiless hand that penciled 
Belshazzar's doom wrote '"Lord and Christ" on the heart of the world. Their dead 
King became "King of Kings" and the spiritual force and the ethical life of men. 
Standards, systems, isms and cisms are changed at His word, and in His commission 
there is power, power to enable the least of His apostles to stand on the Areopagus, in 
the intellectual center of civilized men, smash through the stoic and epicurean schools, 
and recast the philosophy and thought of the world. 



Extempore Jabs 

By J. M. Perry 

It's easy enough to act civil 

When everybody 's treating you white; 

But it's hard to smile while writing the check 
For the tailor who made 'em too tight. 

It's easy enough to be cheery, 

Parading in Government clothes; 
But it's hard to sing, mucking 'round in the trench. 

With hand-grenades flattening your nose. 

It's easy enough to fill dates, 

When "Prof." don't know you're gone; 
But it's hard to gel by, matters not how you try, 

When you make them over the phone. 

It's easy enough to answer 

When asked. Do you like country ham? 
But it's hard to answer every time dead right. 

When taking your final "Zam." 

It's easy enough to cut capers, 

And go buzzing 'round like a bee; 
But it's hard to preach with such power and force 

That you'll honor old A.C.C. 



107 



Domestic Science 



Alma Stokes 
Hattie Delph 
Elsie Harris 
May Pollock 
Verna Belle Haskins 
Susie Dixon 
Jessie Holliday 
Helen Glenn 
Mary Flowers 



Class Roll 

3 Elizabeth Wigcins 

Marie Chapman 

Myrtle King 

Fannie Batts 



Bernice Tucker 
Maude Brown 
Helen May 
Cleora Reed 



108 




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Ill 



Alethian Literary Society 

Colors — Blue and Gold Tlower — Pansy 

Motto— "We Love the Truth 

Yell 

Alethian! Alethian! 
Blue and Gold! 
Alethian! Alethian! 
Heart and Soul! 



Officers 

Christine Whitley President 

Battle Tomlinson Vice-President 

Olive Spear Secretary and Treasurer 

Anna Moore Pianist 

A. C. Meadows Chaplain 



Members 



Beland, J. W. 
Bachelor, Nettie Mae 
Batts, Fannie 
Barnes, Tony 
Beland, John 
Bowen, Kate 
Brown, Maude 
Culpepper, Douglas 
Denny, Ruth 
Dixon, Ada Grey 
Dixon, Clara 
Draughn, Annie 
Elmore, Mary 
Elmore, Tomy 
Fergerson, B. J. 
Glenn, Helen 
Green, Sadie 
Haskins, Verna Belle 
Hodge, Alfred 
Holliday, Jessie 
Jones, Anna Ruth 
Meadows, A. C. 
Meadows, Mabel 
Moore, Anna 



Moore, Elva 
Moye, Fannie 
Moye, Nelle 
Moye, Lawrence 
Moye, Milton 
Nobles, Nettie 
Peele, Agnes 
Peel, Gladys 
Perkins, Selma 
Perry, J. M. 
Phillips, Rupert 
Pollock, Mae 
Rollins, Charley Grey 
Rouse, Richard 
Saunders, Inez 
Spear, Olive 
Stallings, Nora 
Tomlinson, Battle 
Tucker, Bernice 
Whitley, Christine 
Wilson, Lottie 
Wilson, Mildred 
Wolff, Bonita 
Wolff, Ava 



112 




113 



Hesperian Literary Society 

Colors — Red and White Flower — Carnation 

Motto — Facta non Vreba 

Yell 

Rolly-go! Rolly-go! Rolly-go hee! ! 
Hoop-la! Hip-la! Who are we? 
Rolly-go! Rolly-go! Rolly-go hee! ! 
Hesperians! Hesperians! 
of A.C.C. 

Officers 

James Manning President 

Lena Hardee Vice-President 

Kathlyn Jackson Secretary and Treasurer 

Grady Spiegel Chaplain 

Sallie Adams Pianist 



Members 
Adams, Sallie 
Batts, Bennie 
Bennett, Losker 
Boger, Mary 
Bowen, Hillary 
Bowen, Timothy 
Brinson, Lloyd 
Brinson, Zeb 
Brinson, Marion 
Brouchton. Nelson 
Campbell, Warren 
Chapman, Lill 
Delph, Hattie 
Dixon, Susie 
Eagles, Margaret 
Felton, Connor 
Flowers, Mary 
Galloway, Mabel 
Grainger, Pauline 
Hardee, Lena 
Harris, Elise 

Wiggins, Nettie 



Heath, Ray 
Heath, Sybil 
Henderson, Otto 
Jackson, Kathlyn 
Lynch, Mabel 
Lynch, Thelma 
Manning, James 
Manning, William 
McIllwain, Bernice 
Moore, Mary 
Overman, Marcarette 
Perry, Weston 
Reel, Archie 
Smith, Lewis 
Spear, Roger 
Spiegel, Grady 
Stokes, Alma 
Tincle, Vera 
Walker, Annie Lee 
Whitehead, Lewis 
Wiggins, Elizabeth 



114 




115 



A.C.C. Alumni Gossip 



Doc 

Speaking of llie different ways in which a long journey on ihe — - Railroad 

on a hot summer day has been turned into a pilgrimage of pleasure, when a trip of 
hardship only had been anticipated, recalls to my mind a very surprisingly pleasant 
trip I had last summer. 

The day was very hot, and dust mingled with coal cinders was sifting through 
the windows of the pullman to a stifling degree. I stood on the back of the pullman 
as the train rolled out of , little thinking that anyone I knew entered the pull- 
man. Upon returning to my seat, a young army officer sat in the other half of the reser- 
vation. I noticed the insignia of his division, and noticed he wore service chevrons 
for overseas duty. The young man was reading a magazine, so did not look up 
until I asked him about certain points in France at which his division was active. 
Upon looking up I recognized beneath the coal of tan and soldier brown an old 
college mate, whose name, if mentioned, few who have ever known A.C.C. would 
fail to recall multiplied events in every phase of college activities in which this 
young soldier had played the leading role. Mutual exclamations of delight followed 
our recognition of each other. 

Both of us were "fed up" on war and the A.E.F. for that time, so after a brief 
statement each as to the part we had played in the Great War and our different points 
of action, and the like, we turned to the discussion of our future plans. But there was 
litlle interest in this, so we began talking of happy days on the old campus when life 
had not been burdened with hard realities and the human heart had not been scarred 
by the iron grasp of the cruel war. Soon, in the relating of instances of happiness 
and what seemed to the college student hardships, but which in looking back now 
were only amusing incidents, the long marches through the shell-furrowed fields of 
France, the "corn Willie," the taste of which had not fully departed, the dusty, 
smoky train and the midsummer oppressive heat were all forgot and we were living 
again in the good old college halls, our ears were ringing to the dear old college 
yells and songs, and we were again reviewing the grand old campus scenes with old 
friends who seemed to come in and travel with us again. 

'"What has become of all of the old crowd?" my companion asked. 

"Well, that depends on which crowd you refer to," I replied. 

"Suppose we begin from the early days," he suggested. 

"Fine!" I said. "The best I see is to take the alumni and others straight 
through." 

My former college mate said, "The first class graduated was in 1903, was it not?" 

"Yes," I replied. "W. H. Mizell, who has ever been a successful teacher and is 
now a prosperous newspaper man; Ada Tyson, now Mrs. J. Y. Swain of Henderson, 

116 



N. C, and Prof. Glen G. Cole of Bethany, West Virginia, were the first graduates to 
ever step from the A.C.C. rostrum. In their chosen work credit has been reflected 
on the college, too." 

"Well, who was the one girl graduated in 1905? She was from Avden and had a 
boy's name?" 

''Oh, yes! Jimmie Davis." 

'"That's the girl. What has become of her?" 

"Oh, she is married. Her name is Mrs. R. F. Pillman." 

"By the way, did you ever know Rosa Moore and Mary Moye?" he asked. 
"They were very popular in college. I've lost sight of them in late years, but have 
often thought about them." 

"Why, yes, I know Rosa is still in Farmville. and Mary has been married for 
three or four years." 

"Well, what has become of that first big class that went out in 1907 — all girls? 
Let's see if I can recall who all of them are. May Anderson was one." 

"She is still May Anderson," I said. 

"I used to hear from May once in a while, but this army game has put me out of 
touch with all old-time friends very largely." 

"I believe she is in Washington, D. C. in Government work now," I said. 

"Wasn't Daphne Carraway in that group?" he asked. 

"Yes." 

"Where is she?" 

"She teaches in Wilson and does some chautauqua work, too, I think." 

"There were about three girls from Kinston in that class," he reminded me. 
"Let's see if I can recall them — " 

"I'm wise to the Kinston constituency," I replied with enthusiasm. "Ruth 
Howard, Mary Mosely and Hattie Daily are the ones you have in mind." 

"Yes. What has become of them?" 

"Ruth Howard and Clay Andrews have been married for years. And Mary 
Mosely married Loins of her home town, and still lives there. Hattie Daily is still 
enjoying single blessedness and substituting in the Kinston school as teacher." 

"How about Eliza Kennedy?" my companion asked. "She was very popular 
during our college days." 

"Yes," I said, "and very talented. She is married. She married Von Dillon of 
LaGrange. You knew her sister Lucy — the really pretty girl in that group?" 

"Yes," he replied. "Guess I did know her. She was in the bunch who helped 
to tie the teachers on one April Fool's Day. Lucy married Harry Hodges and they 
are very prosperous in Belhaven." 

"Another girl in that group was Sally Brooks. I have recently found that she 
was working with a big banking house in Washington, D. C, and is still single. Two 
others of this group are happily married. Clyde Farmer married Palmer Harris 
and they lived in Wilson. Elma Basnight married Hurbert Lupton of New Bern. 
They are now living in Tarboro." 

"There is another girl that seems to me used to be in that crowd — the girl who 
used to help Miss Day with Art — 

117 



"Nell Kell of Farmville?" 

"That's her." 

"She is still there, and single, I think." 

"There is one former student I'd like to get trace of. This is Bessie Wilkinson, 
who graduated in Music in 1908. She graduated at the same time Leon Edgerton 
graduated in Voice." 

"Leon married a fellow by the name of Grizzard and now lives in Kenly." 

"I'll tell you what class had a strong element in it — the class in which C. Manly 
Morton graduated," continued the old College Chum. "What has become of them?" 

"C. Manly has made a high mark," I informed. "He is now a missionary to 
Paraguay, South America, with an enviable record." 

"How about some of the others?" my companion asked. 

"Well," I replied, "Sallie Wilson is still single and holds a Government position 
in Washington, D. C." 

"You remember the rather stout girl who played the piano like a hurricane — 
Mable Jones?" broke in my fellow passenger. 

"Yes. She's married and lives in Charleston. Sue Yelverton married Dr. Eagles, 
who has a lucrative practice near Wilson, and Elizabeth Eagles is now Mrs. Smith 
and lives near Walstonburg. Mary Edwards taught Expression at the college one 
year — lost sight of her before leaving for France." 

"Then," mused my companion, "those were days of real fun. Society spirit ran 
high, athletics boomed and real sports were around the old campus. That 1909, 
'10 and '11 group were all a bunch of regulars." 

"Yes," I said. "You knew Ersie Walker? She married a fellow named Neeley 
and lives in Selma, Alabama. Julia Farmer teaches English at Massey's Business 
College, Richmond; Rosa Taylor still lives in Wilson; Annie Barrett is now Mrs. 
Charles Arrington and lives in Rocky Mount; Kathlyn Wallace is married and still 
at Jonesville; Lela Flowers is now Mrs. J. A. Stickland of Norfolk; Verdie Noble has 
been in bad health; she is still single and lives with her parents near Kinston — a fine 
girl, too." 

"Well, what has happened to Lossie Davis, Harriett Settle, and all that group of 
girls who played a high hand in college affairs?" he asked. 

"Matrimony struck two of them," I answered. "Harriett Settle is now Mrs. B. B. 
Plyler of Wilson and Mattie is now Mrs. Eugene Wood of Kinston." 

"Where is Lossie?" he broke in. 

"Do not know. Think she is still single and living in Lucama. Georgia How- 
ard, Elsie Gardner, Carrie Deans and Estelle Griffin are all in Wilson yet, as far as I 
know. I run across some one of them occasionally." 

"You recall the 1912 class?" he said. "Small but very strong." 

"Yes," I answered. 

"Ever hear anything of them?" 

"I met J. J. Walker out in Tennessee a few days ago. Kenneth Bowen is pastor 
of a church in New York now." 

"Where is Horace Settle?" I was asked. 

118 



"Horace and Agnes Spain were married several years ago. Horace is in bad 
health. Quit the ministry and is in business with his father-in-law. Tell you 
another good group of students that count A.C.C. as their Alma Mater," I suggested. 

"Who are they?" 

"Susie Grey Woodard; she is now Mrs. Luther Tomlinson of Wilson." 

"Well, how about that girl who could paint so well?" he asked. 

"Lillie Hewitt?" I informed: "She is still out about {Catherine Lake. You 
remember the girl with red hair and such a brilliant mind?" 

"Sallie Bridges?" 

"Yes," I answered. "She is now Mrs. Henry Scott; lives at Elm City. Tell you 
another girl that was fine: Eunice Andrews; she is now Mrs. Mosley. Elsie Langley 
was in that same class. She was brilliant, too. Lives at Elm City still, I think." 

"Let's see — your's was the Class of '14, was it not?" queried my friend. 

"Yes," I said. "Among others, in the class were Ben Oden. Don't know how 
he is getting along. You remember Blanche Wells? She was in my class also, and 
is now teaching in Wilson." 

"How about the little girl from Kinston who was the artist?" I was asked. 

'You mean Velma Harrington?" I asked. "She is now Mrs. W. S. Tucker and 
lives near Greenville. Elsie Pugh is also married, I've heard. Married a tobacconist 
in Greenville." 

"Where is Alice Privette?" he asked. 

"Alice," I answered, "is the only member of the alumni to be reported dead. 
She was a noble type of womanhood, too. That Class of 1915 was a good one, too. 
\ou knew most of them in their homes?" 

"Yes," the answer came. "I remember a number of them. Henrietta Moye — 
where is she?" 

"At home in Farmville; taught a few years." 

"And how about Fannie?" 

"Teaching at the college and as loyal as any student who ever left our halls," 
I replied. 

"How about Bess and Hattie Hodges?" 

"They are teaching around LaGrange and living at home. Jessie Hodges, Mary 
Belle Smith and Lill Chapman were also members of that class." 

"There were a bunch of girls who went out in 1916 with only two men in the 
class. They were a representative crowd of graduates." 

"Yes," I interrupted," I know all of them. Willa Chestnut, she lives in Wash- 
ington, D. C, now; Sallie Hadley married recently; Fannie Manning is still at her 
home in Williamston and a loyal supporter of A.C.C; Irma Cannon is still in Ayden; 
Meta Harrington's home is now in Clayton and so far as I know she is still there; 
Jessie Hodges took her A.B. with that class; Sam Jones is at his home; Ruth Whitley 
is as enthusiastic as ever for the college; Ruth Hardy, I guess, lives in Georgia; 
"Bro. Joel" finished in Expression that year and continued for his A.B. — graduated 
last spring and is now at Vanderbilt. And, by the way, he is married, also. Eliza- 
beth Kinsey is with her parents in LaGrange and is a very popular girl among a host 
of friends." 

119 



"Well," remarked my friend, after this breathless narrative of the Class of '16, 
"you surely have a close 'tab' on the old students of A.C.C. Wonder if you know as 
much about the Classes of '17 and '18?" 

I smiled acknowledgment, as I had just come in contact with a number of those 
classes. "Sadler, you know," I started as my companion settled back in the corner 
of the dusty seat, satisfied that he would get a good line on the rest of the college 
alumni, "returned to Wilson the year after he and Hattie Mewborne were married and 
graduated, both of them with the A.B. degree; they later spent a year in Vanderbilt, 
where Lee made a splendid record as a student. I did hear where Clem Bridges was 
located, but I do not recall now. Mary Richardson is still at her South Carolina 
home, as well as Maude Russell. I lost sight of H. M. Ainsley, but think he is still 
teaching; quite a capable fellow. Clair Hodges and Ernest Paschal are to be married 
this fall, I have heard. Be a good match, too. Ernest is destined to make a good 
mark, all right. Ella Hackney was a fine student; she still lives in Wilson and is still 
loyal to the college. Maude Bowen is at her home in Belhaven; her time is divided 
between teaching, acting in capacity of organist at First Christian Church, and having 
a good time. Juanita Crocket is to be married soon, and Bonila Wolff is teaching in 
the college. Most of the 1918 class were rather new to me. Lehman Carawan," I 
continued, "is now in Alabama. The Clay girls are at their home in Beckley, West 
Virginia. Nell Krise teaches Domestic Science at the college, and her sister Carrie is 
married — now Mrs. J. H. Shrewsberry of Logan, West Virginia. 'Abe' Mattox and 
his brother Tom are both in Vanderbilt, doing good work for which they are expecting 
to get Master's degrees. Agnes Peele is now office secretary at the college, and John 
Waters is now developing a splendid rural church work near New Bern and meeting 
with much success. As for the class of this spring, I know Joel Vause and Magruder 
Sadler graduated. Joel, as I stated, is married, and Magruder is willing to be to a 
very fine girl down in my section of the State." 

"Well, what about yourself?" came the unexpected question. 

"Oh," I remarked indifferently, "I will first get out of this man's army, then I 
guess I'll settle back in my former work. Hide away in bachelor quarters, do the 
best I can in my own line of work, and watch the rest of my old friends commit 
matrimony and launch upon an open sea of bliss." 

About that time the porter came through calling, " — next slop; change 

trains for ." My friend and I reaching the parting of the ways. We arose, 

expressed mutual satisfaction over the happy incident which had thrown us together 
on a long journey. Both were delighted that glimpses into the old life, before the 
sobering days of the war intervened, could be had. We had forgotten shot and shell, 
camp life, long marches, battle roar, and all their accompaniments. We shook hands 
with hopes to meet again and parted at the close of a day with our minds so filled 
with college days, college friends and campus scenes that we felt as though we were 
living again in a world that had been deluged but suddenly reappearing just as it had 
formerly existed. Each of us, too, were seized with a longing for early reunions of 
former college and class mates as through our minds (lilted pictures of scenes now 
sad, now gay, but welcomed regardless of their nature. 



120 




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mmnMzmMzsm 



121 



"The Wranglers" 



One of the livest organizations of A.C.C. is "The Wranglers." This club is com- 
posed of nine members. Prof. F. F. Grim is indeed fortunate in being the only 
honorary member; "while the active members are Selma Perkins, Christine Whitley, 
Anna Moore, Lottie Wilson, Marion Brinson, Lawrence Moye, Alfred Meadows, and 
Mabel Lynch. 

The meetings are held every Thursday evening at 6:30. Under Mr. Grim's 
leadership, the first half hour is spent in a valuable discussion of parliamentary law. 
Believing with Burke that "Example is the school of mankind, and they will learn at 
no other," The Wranglers spend the rest of the hour in "putting into practice" the 
many things learned. This is all done with the hope of gaining sufficient practice in 
properly conducting public assemblies with no violation of parliamentary law. 

The purpose of this organization is training in clear thinking and practice in the 
simple, straightforward expression of one's thoughts. Realizing that they are here 
for the purpose of preparing themselves for efficient citizenship, The Wranglers strive 
to respect the opinions of all people who differ with them; but, on the other hand, to 
make no statement or accept any which cannot be supported by sufficient evidence. 

Then, shall we not prophesy truly if we say some of the future lawyers, congress- 
men, congresswomen, and debaters of the "Old North State" will be so as the result of 
their work with The Wranglers? 




123 



Hesperian Literary Society Debaters 




Mary Moore 



I. B. Brinson 



Mabel Lynch 



Alethian Literary Society Debaters 




A. C. Meadows Christine Whitley R. A. Phillips 



124 



"A C C " 



With apologies to Kipling 

By the old and moss-grown building, lookin eastward to the street, 
There's a fair-haired girl a-settin, an I know she thinks o" meat; 
For the wind is in the pine trees, an the electric bells they call, 
"Come you, back, you truant maiden; come you back to study hall." 

Come you back to study hall, 

Where are watchful teachers all! 
Cant you hear their feet a-trampin' from their rooms into the hall? 

In the halls of A.C.C., 

Where the students ever be, 
An the "Prof" comes up like thunder outer classroom where sits she. 

'Er middy lie was yeller an 'er little cap was green, 

An er name ivas "I-can'l-do-it" — )es the same it's always been, 

An I seed 'er fust a-grinnin an a-havin heaps d fun, 

An a-wastin all 'er energy on a monstrous piece o' gum — 

Gum she bought at Barnes' store, 

But she won l buy any more. 
Mighty lot she cared for gum, when the supper bell it rung, 

In the halls of A.C.C., 

Where the students ever be, 
An the "Prof" comes up like thunder outer classroom where sits she. 

With the students on the campus an the sun a-droppin low, 
She'd git 'er Ukulele an she'd sing "Kullalo-lo!" 
With er hand upon 'er "ukie" an eye upon the street, 
She useter watch the teachers for the boys she wish to meet, 

Boys that strolled along the street, 

Oh, the boys she longed to meet! 
Where the teachers walked so faithful with their never wearied feel. 

In the halls of A.C.C., 

Where the students ever be, 
An' the "Prof" comes up like thunder outer classroom where sits she. 

But that's all hove be'ind 'er — long ago an' fur away, 

For she rises with the chickens at the breakin of the day, 

An she's learnin here at A.C. that there's work that must be done, 

Though the siveeter dreams are calling, there's the race that must be run. 

125 



No, she don't want nothin else 

But to git outside these cells, 
Away from discipline an study an the recitation bells! 

In the halls of A.C.C., 

Where the students ever be, 
An the "Prof comes up like thunder outer classroom where sits she. 

She is sick o' wastin' good times on a beastly hard lesson. 
An' a-thinkin o' the honors that the other girl has won; 
Though she walk with fifty students, or the entire student band, 
They talk o' high ambitions, an' wot does she understand? 

High ambitions, honors and — 

Law! wot does she understand? 
She's an easy good-time maiden, for an easy good-lime land! 

In the halls of A.C.C.. 

Where the students ever be, 
An' the "Prof" comes up like thunder outer classroom where sits she. 

Ship 'er somewheres from old W'ilson, where the best is like the worst, 
Where there's plenty Coca-Cola an' a girl can quench 'er thirst; 
For the study bells are ringin', an' it's there she would not sit, 
In the old an' moss-groivn building looking eastward to the street. 

On the lawn an' in the hall. 

Where are watchful teachers all. 
An she sighs indeed at parting from her gum in early fall. 

In the halls of A.C.C.. 

Where the students ever be, 
An the "Prof" comes up like thunder outer classroom where sits she. 

B. G. W. 



Match-making at A.C.C. 

Annual Report from the "White House" 
An Autumn Recipe 

Take a boy in love and a girl not quite convinced. Place together in a secluded 
corner of the porch with two chairs, and stir slowly. Add a slight breeze from the 
south, a clash of courage, and a heaping teaspoonful of persuasiveness. Sprinkle with 
afternoon sunshine sifted through September foliage, and keep away until wanted. 

Results: Unless the exact proportions of ingredients are put in, according as 
each case demands, some will take more time to show results than others, some may 
fail and curdle, others may be suited for a future wedding feast. 

126 



<D 

r 




127 



Phi Sigma Tau 

Founded 1912 

Sorore in Facilitate 
(3) Lillian Chapman 

Sorores in Urbe 

Mrs. H. P. Mosley Mrs. Sultan Flowers 

Mrs. Paul E. Jones Mrs. J. G. Luttrell 

Hattie Hodces Bess Hodges 

Henrietta Move 



1913 

Jessie Hodges 
Lillian Chapman 

1914 
Fannie Manning 
Mrs. Foxhall 
Ruth Hardy 
Annie Laurie Lang 

1915 
Lucy Brothers 
Charlotte Hodces 
Daisy Manning 
Mrs. A. B. Windham 



1917 
Mrs. Kate Price 
Grace Rice 
Lura Clay 
1 1 ) Ada Grey Dixon 

1918 

Hattie Mosley 
Helene Hundell 
i 2 1 Lottie Wilson 

1919 
Mrs. Irving Winstead 
Leola Saunders 

( 4 1 Mary Moore 

(51 Christine Whitley 



1916 
Mrs. K. A. Stewart 
Lillie Belle Hardison 



1920 
( 7 ) Sallie Adams 
( 6 1 Anna Moore 



Colors — Black and Gold Flower — Black-eyed Susan 

Motto — "Cor unum, via una" 



128 




129 




Phi Epsilon Tau 



Established at A. C. College March 13, 1918 
Colors -Black and Gold Floiver — Red Carnation 

Charter Members 

Warren C. Lappin Joshua Earnest Paschall 

Lloyd J. Chapman Macruder E. Sadler 

Lawrece A. Moye Joel E. Vause 



Fratres in College 

Class 1920 
Lawrence A. Moye 

Class 1921 
Marion B. Brinson Alfred C. Meadows 

Class 1923 
James C. Manning William C. Manning 



130 




131 




133 




A-l Club 



Colors — Green and White Flower — White Rose 

Motto — "First, Last, and Always" 



Yell 

Rack-a-Chick-a-Boom ! 
Rack-a-Chick-a-Boom ! 
Rack-a-Chick-a-Rack-a-Chick-a! 
Boom ! Boom ! Boom ! 
Rip! Rah! Rae! 
Rip! Rah! Rae! 
A No. l's, A No. l's, 
"A.C.C." 

"Kat" Jackson President 

Mabel Galloway Secretary-Treasurer 



Susie Dixon 
Elsie Harris 
"Jess" Holiday . 
Mabel Galloway 

"Teenie" 

Meeting Place — Room No. 9 



"Kat" Jackson 
Thelma Lynch 
Mabel Lynch 
Thelma Proctor 
Whitley 

Time — 7 o'clock 



134 



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Northwestern Club 

Mollo— "Get Up and Get" 
Flower — Sunflower Colors — Gold and Silver 

Yell 

In chickosaw, 

In chickosee, 
The Northwest Club of A.C.C. 
Chickosaw, chickosaw in chickosee, 
The very best club at A.C.C. 

We! We! We! 

Alfred Clifton Meadows President 

Mabel Meadows Vice-President 

Bonita Wolff Secretary 

Helen Glenn • Treasurer 

John Dee Wolff Yell Leader 

Anna Moore Sergeant-at-Arms 

136 




Big Four 

Symbol — Cattails Color — Brown and Green 

Motto — Toujours Prete 

Yell 

Hoo! Hoo! Hoo! 
Who are we? 
Big Four, Big Four, 
Of A.C.C. 

Lena Hardee Chief est Hooter 

"Jess" Holiday _ Meanest Hooter 

Kate Bowen Loudest Hooter 

Annie Ruth Jones Quietest Hooter 

137 




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138 




The "Atlas Congenial Club " 

Organized January 12; 1920 

Colors — Red and Green 

Flower— Red Rose Emblem — Long-leaf Pine 

Motto— "To Be or Not to Be" 



Charter Members 

Rupert A. Phillips, President 
Lloyd T. Brinson, Vice-President 
William C. Manning, Sec.-Treas. 



Lawrence A. Moye 
James C. Manning 
D. Louis Smith 



139 



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140 



The Blazing Pine Knot 



Mr. Grim (in Education) : "Miss Wilson, who was Mendel?" 
Lottie: "I don't know, but Mendels-sohn was a musician." 

Dean Smith : "Miss Fannie, Selma is calling you." 

Miss Fannie: "Well, tell her to come to me in my room if she wants to speak 
to me." 

Dean Smith: "I mean Selma, N. C." 

Professor Hilley (in Bible) : ""What was the result of the first sin?" 
Nelle Moye: "Eve was turned into a pillar of salt." 

Susie Dixon I the day for mid-term examination on Algebra ) : "Girls, I feel 
like I'm walking around in a radical with a square root on my head." 

Dr. Smith I in History ) : "Miss Hardee, will you please tell me all you know 
about Martin Luther?" 

Lena: "Really, Dr. Smith, I looked clear through the Bible and couldn't find 
a thing about him." 

Lottie: "I was peacefully happy in my room last night." 
John D.: "What did you dream?" 

Lottie: "I dreamed that the proposal to me in the play was real. I might 
have known it was too good to be true." 

Mrs. Grim I in English) : "Girls, how do you pronounce J-a-p-a-n-e-s-e?" 
Blanche (watching Glacose Hinnant drive up) responded absent-mindedly: 
"Josephine." 

Marion Brinson (in Hesperian Society) : "James, make a three-minutes talk on 
your girl." 

James (dryly) : "I don't know much — ask the other fellow." 

Selma: "Bill, where does Smith room?" 

Bill: "In the laboratory" (getting dormitory and laboratory mixed). 



141 



The Future of A. C. College 



Some eighteen years ago the Disciples of Christ in North Carolina, perceiving 
that they had a great opportunity to establish an institution of higher learning, 
founded Atlantic Christian College. Some of the noblest spirits of the day cooper- 
atively laid the foundations, of whom were J. J. Harper, Dennis W. Davis, W. J. 
Crumpler, E. A. Moye, B. H. Melton, Dr. H. D. Harper, and others. 

In the presidency of this institution four men have served, as follows: J. C. 
Coggins, for two years; J. J. Harper, for three years; J. C. Caldwell, for nine years; 
R. A. Smith, for four years. These men enrolled almost three thousand students in 
the period of their incumbencies. A. C. College began when her liabilities far 
exceeded her assets, whereas the happy reverse obtains today, when our college assets 
exceed her liabilities by a full one hundred and eighty-eight thousand dollars. 

What has the future in store for A. C. College? 

Our college is situated in Wilson, North Carolina, which, with more than two 
score of passenger trains daily, is the most accessible point in the Stale for the com- 
munity she can best serve. And Wilson has all the advantages of the small city of 
fifteen thousand people, as contrasted with the prevailing provincialism of the small 
town, or the disquieting complexities of the large city. Yet this small city is a com- 
mercial center, as the largest loose-leaf market in the world for bright tobacco, 
outselling the Twin Cities, her nearest competitor, this past season by three and a hall 
million pounds. And the famous Hackney factories arid much to the importance of 
the city in manufacture. Here, also, are the attractive places of worship, manned 
with able ministers, of the six or seven representative Protestant religious bodies of 
the region. 

This College is open, as a matter of course, to all students, without discrimination 
as to religious preferences, and each year several religious communions are repre- 
sented in the student enrollment. But the college is owned and operated by the Dis- 
ciples of Christ of the Carolinas, and is deeded in fee simple to them. Now, it 
happens that of the Disciples in North Carolina about nine-tenths of their number 
are rural, or subsist very largely by their rural holdings. Furthermore, that part of 
North Carolina in which Disciples are most numerous is shaded on the map by the 
geographer to indicate thus the richest agricultural section in the State. This past 
season these farms were productive of cash earnings beyond all precedent, only three 
States in the whole Union standing ahead of the "Old North State.'" in this respect, 
namely, Texas, Iowa, and Illinois. It stands to reason this prosperity is certain to 
continue. 

142 



The future of A. C. College is thus conditioned, not by any evident poverty, but 
certainly by the actual enormous wealth of the community which it serves. 

And what may be said of the educational status of this institution? It has ever 
been the ambition of her administrative excutives to provide the means for student 
training equal to any institution of higher learning within the State. The quality of 
this training has been recognized expressly by the State's leading educational authority, 
and credit is therefore given hour for hour in the University of this Commonwealth. 

When a college is so grounded, materially, religiously, and educationally, what 
of her future? 

In the day which is immediately ahead there must be and will be an ample 
endowment fund provided, likewise a corresponding radical increase of equipment, 
which is just as imperatively necessary. The thirty thousand dollars now in hand as 
a permanent fund from the estate of C. N. Nurney, is but a beginning of the endow- 
ment which must be and will be provided that the college may substantially develop 
her true capacities for service to this highly favored region. This enlargement 
campaign will be aggressively and persistently pushed to completion. The leaders 
of the constituency of our college have come to the profound conviction that her 
future pivots on her adequate financial undergirding, and with crusading zeal they 
will see their conviction through. 

With the enormous expansion of wealth in the region where our college chiefly 
serves, her soul will be disembodied, if she cannot share equitablv in the all-prevailing 
prosperity of the day. 

The ministry of the Disciples, in common with their religious neighbors, is 
suffering fearfully from gradual depletion. Instead of training men by the hundreds 
for the ministry as our college has done in the brief period of her history, she must 
train them by the thousands in the years ahead. And when virile young men, choice 
in their native blood and native training, shall minister effectively in this large com- 
munity, they will duplicate the record of the last eighteen years — yea, they will more 
than double the strength of the church in this given period. 

In that great region of our State east of Raleigh, embracing scores of counties, 
A. C. College pioneered, and has long held first place as the institution of higher 
learning. She must and will adorn that place of honor by her continued dynamic 
expression of the highest ideals of educational service. A highly honored man of 
America said that the World War taught us that nothing is good but service. Her 
service to her young men and her young women, by A. C. College, will strengthen 
the State, breathe life into the church, and conserve the essentials of Christian 
civilization. 

Her thousands and thousands of children who are, and who are yet to be, will 
justify and crown her life, and sense for her the coming of the glad new day. 



143 



Editorial 

After many days of toil and sleepless nights another 
Pine Knot is ready for the press. The work, although long 
and difficult, has not heen at all unpleasant. 

It has not been the aim of the editors to make this vol- 
ume of the Pine Knot so much a work of literature or a work 
of art as a mirror of the student life. If we have accom- 
plished this, the editors will not feel that their efforts have 
been in vain. 

The Editor-in-Chief wishes to take this opportunity to 
thank each one of the staff for their interest and cooperation 
in this publication. 

He also wishes to express his appreciation to the business 
men of Wilson who by their hearty support have made possi- 
ble this issue of the Pine Knot. 



144 




145 




In behalf of the Staff of the 1920 Pine Knot, I wish 
to express appreciation for the support of those who are 
advertising in this publication. Let us keep in mind that 
they deserve the patronage of the students and community. 

Please mention The Pine Knot when dealing with 
or writing to advertisers. 



Rupert A. Phillips, 

Business Manager. 




Index to Advertisers 



PAGE 



Daily Motor Company 149 ( 

Welch's 5, 10 and 25 Cent Store 149 

Clark Brothers 150 

Boykin Grocery Company 150 | 

Barrett-Patrick Company 150 

Welfare Auto Company 151 

/Etna Life Insurance Company — W. H. Price, Agent 151 

Branch Banking and Trust Company 151 

Atlantic Christian College 152 

Wilson Hardware Company 153 

S. B. Moore, Architect 153 

Goldsboro Street Grocery Company 153 

Ernest T. Barnes Grocery Company 154 

Turlington & Morrison Drug Store 154 

The W. W. Simms Lumber Company 154 

The Guardian Life Insurance Company 155 

Qtiinn-McGowan Furniture Company 156 

Williams & Palmer 156 

Center Brick Warehouse 156 

O. V. Foust's Studio 157 

Wilson Shoe Store 157 

Patterson Drug Company 157 

Hackney Brothers' Garage 158 

The General Electric Company 159 

F. L. Voliva Hardware Company 160 

Crute & Fleming, Banner Warehouse 161 

R. E. Hagan & Company 161 

T. F. Pettus & Company 161 

Farmers Cotton Oil Company 162 

Knott-Borden Company 163 

C. L. Woodard & Company 163 

Traffic Motor Sales Company 163 

Starr, the Florist : 164 

Wilson Sanatorium 163 

Wilson Insurance and Realty Company 163 

Barnes-Harrell Grocery Company 165 

Edwards & Broughton Printing Company 166 

Gaynors' 167 

E. P. Hyman & Co 167 

Tomlinson & Company 167 

Farmers Union Trading Company 168 

Burton Brothers Auction Company 168 

Stokes, Tomlinson & Company 168 



j 



I 



DAILY MOTOR COMPANY ! 



Service 

i 

i 



i 
i 

Tires and Tubes Accessories and Parts ' 

' Distributors of j 

i GRANT SIX MOTOR CARS \ 

i GRANT MOTOR TRUCKS ! 

! i 



i 



1 Phone No. 155 230-2 South Tarboro Street WILSON, N. C. I 



I ! 

I WELCH'S 5-10-25c STORES CO. 

I i 

' Stores at ■ I 

[ \ 

\ WILSON, N. C. 

; FARMVILLE, N. C. 

LaGRANGE, N. C. 
' AYDEN, N. C. j 

SMITHFIELD, N. C. 

WELDON, N. C. 

i 

! 

j This is a North Carolina Corporation, composed of Wilson 

Business Men. Spend your money with home people. 

I 



149 



CLARK BROTHERS 

WILSON'S SHOPPING CENTER 



ROLLER CHAMPION FLOUR 



l 



Thanking you for your past patronage, we extend you a hearty invitation to make our | 

store your shopping center while in the City of Wilson. 



I 

J 

i We appreciate the College tratle. ' 

| PHONE 440 WILSON. N. C. ' 

I I 



J 

j THE BEST COOKS USE 

i 
j 
I 

j Boykin Grocery Company 

! Wholesale Distributors WILSON, N. C. 



| I 

! CORRECT WEARING APPAREL | 

j FOR WOMEN AND MISSES 

j i 

1 Millinery and Furnishings l 

I | 

J 

| BARRETT-PATRICK CO. 

! 

Hackney Building 

i ! 

j Nash Street Wilson, N. C. | 

i i 

i i 



ISO 



! WELFARE AUTO COMPANY j 

TELEPHONE 313 Announcing WILSON, N. C. 

THE NEW REO SIX— The Gold Standard of Values ! 

1 We specialize in Painting, Top Building. Batten' Repairing, and carry a full stock of * 

Tires, Springs and Accessories for all makes of cars. We give Quick * 

and Good Service to all our patrons. | 

305 PHONES 313 I 



NOTARY PUBLIC 



| Banking House, Furniture Undivided Profits 43,505.18 



i 

| $4,872,083.73 $4,872,083.73 

Upon the strength of the above statement and the backing of our Directors 
| we solicit your business, promising every accommodation consistent with sound banking 

No account too small to receive our most careful attention 



! 



I 

! W. H. PRICE 

I 

D 

| AGENT FOR 

j 

xEtna Life insurance Company j 
j 

O 

! 

j Office Carolina Building WILSON, N. C 

A. 



CONDENSED STATEMENT OF CONDITION OF 

BRANCH BANKING & TRUST COMPANY 

WILSON, N. C. 



At the Close of Business December 31, 1919 I 

I i 

j RESOURCES LIABILITIES 

Loans and Discounts £3 305 90Q fiR Canitut St.,,-1.- « 1(10 00(10(1 I 



Loans and Discounts $3,305,209.68 Capital Stock $ 100,000.00 

Stocks and Bonds 20.858.76 Surplus 50,000.00 | 



j and Fixtures .__ 33.500.00 Deposits 4,678,578.55 

Cash and Due from Banks, 1.512,515.29 I 



OFFICERS | 

S. G. Mewborn, President E. W. Staples, Cashier I 

H. D. Bateman, Vice-Pres. E. A. Darden, Trust Officer | 



151 



j ATLANTIC ! 

j 
j 
j 

= 

i 

i 

f For Men and Women 

I 

j 

i 

o 

I 
j 
j 



CHRISTIAN COLLEGE 



A FOUR- YEAR HIGH SCHOOL 



j 

j A HIGH-CLASS MUSIC SCHOOL 

j 

j A STANDARD COLLEGE 

j 

j 

I & 

I 

j 

j 

j 

j 

i 

• THE PRESIDENT Wilson, N. C. 

j 
j 



152 



Write for Catalogue 



Wilson Hardware Co. 



LEADERS IN 



BUILDING MATERIAL 



IN FRONT OF COURTHOUSE 



S. B. MOORE 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

HEAVY AND FANCY GROCERIES 

CALL PHOXE 748 WILSOX, N. C. 



153 



SPORTING GOODS 

HARDWARE | 



I 

I 

PHONES 18 AND 19 WILSON, N. C. | 

1 



I 



Architect I 

! 

W I L S N, N. C. I 



! ! 

, GOLDSBORO STREET GROCERY CO. 

' HEADQUARTERS FOR i 



i 

j // it's Groceries you want, call 

\ ERNEST T. BARNES 

i ) 

i 
j 

c 

On West Lee Street, Opposite College ' 

Phone No. 913 Wilson, N. C. j 



I 



i 



Dealer in Staple and Fancy Groceries, Soft Drinks and Candies 



i 

! TURLINGTON & MORRISON 



'The Big Busy Drug Store' 



\ 
1 

i 

j PHONES 233 AND 168 WILSON, N. C 



NUNNALLYS. WHITMAN'S AND QUINBYS CANDIES 

PROMPT SERVICE AND A HEARTY WELCOME AWAIT YOU HERE 



i 

i 

THE W. W. SIMMS COMPANY 

I 
j 

j WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 

I 

f 

j MANUFACTURE I I I |y| ^S F ^\ OF ALL KINDS ( 

I 

SASH, DOORS AND BLINDS AND WHATEVER IS NEEDED 

j 
j 
I 

i 



IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF YOUR HOME 



ESTIMATES FURNISHED ON APPLICATION j 

! i 

! • 



154 



THE GUARDIAN LIFE INSURANCE CO. 
OF AMERICA 

The Company of Modern Insurance Service 
ESTABLISHED IN 1860 UNDER THE LAWS OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 



WAIVER OF PREMIUMS AND AN- 
NUITY IN CASE OF DISABILITY. 
If the Insured shall become totally dis- 
abled before age 60 as a result of dis- 
ease or accident, the Company will waive 
payment of premiums falling due during 
such disability and continue to pay 
dividends and allow guaranteed values 
and other benefits as if the premiums 
were being paid in cash, and in addi- 
tion to waiving premiums will pay to 
the Insured an annuity of one-tenth of 
the face amount of the policy as long 
as he shall remain totally disabled. At 
the maturity of the policy the sum in- 
sured will be payable in full without 
any deduction for premiums waived or 
annuity payments made. 

A DOUBLE INDEMNITY. In case of 
the death of the Insured before age 60 
as a result of accident of any kind, the 
amount payable as a claim by death 
will be double the face amount of the 
policy. 

For these special benefits in case of 
disability or accidental death a moder- 
ate premium is charged. 



YOU "intend" to apply for 
more insurance some time, 
don't you? 

Very good — BUT 

It isn't what you "intend" to 
do that counts 

It Is What You Do 

Rent and grocery bills can't be 
paid with "good intentions." 

Do you KNOW that you will 
be living and in good health 
next month? 

If you can't answer "YES," do 
something toward getting your 
house in order. 



Let us talk Insurance NOW 
The Guardian Gives Safety to Policyholders 

A. W. FETTER, Manager A. C. MEADOWS, Special Agent 

Greensboro General Agency WILSON, N. C. 

504-505 American Exchange Nat. Bank Bldg., Greensboro, N. C. 



155 



<JuumyWe&xw#ii?^itttiwe 




GET OUR PRICES BEFORE PLACING YOUR ORDER 



TELEPHONE 41 WILSON, N. C. 



. | .|i^J!M#lll ■ *G , 

WILSON, N.C. j 



j 

j LICENSED EMBALMERS AND FUNERAL DIRECTORS ! 

i ! 

\ We handle the very best grades of Furniture '• 



I 

j 

WILLIAMS & PALMER i 

I ! 

j COAL, WOOD, LATHS, SHINGLES AND BRICK ' 

j 

I 

J 

I 
I 



i I 

| CENTER BRICK WAREHOUSE | 

i i 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA j 



I 

The Center Brick Warehouse for the 
Sale of Leaf Tobacco 

! 

I THE HOME OF THE FARMERS OF EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA j 

( I 

I j 

| COZART, EAGLES & CARR \ 

i 

Owners and Proprietors ' 

! i 

i i 



156 



On North Tarboro Street 



WE OFFER YOU QUALITY AXD SERVICE IN FINE SHOES 
AND HOSIERY FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 

PHONE 800 109 E. NASH STREET WILSON, N. C. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

j Photographs, Portraits in Oil, Water Color, Sepia, Pastel and 

Crayon, Artistic Picture Frames, Kodaks and Supplies, \ 

I ..... j 

| as well as Commercial and Amateur Finishing 

I i 

| ARE FOUND AT 

| 0. V. FOUST'S | 

j Leading Photographer's Art Studio j 

j 
j 

I No Stairs to Climb j 

! 

j All Photo Cuts in this Annual Were Reproduced by FOUST'S STUDIO j 

i i 



i WILSON SHOE STORE 

c 

I 
j 

I 
j 

s 

j 



! PATTERSON DRUG COMPANY, Inc. ! 

! 'I 

; The Safe Drug Store j 

I | 

< TARKENTON & SESSOMS, Props. WILSON, N. C. ] 

! i 



157 



Standard Eight 

A Power ful Car 



T^HE Standard Eight has power 
to meet any emergency of traf- 
fic. It delivers that power so easily 
that its performance is as unos- 
tentatious as are its finish and 
appointments. 

Coupled with the pride of owner- 
ship in its beauty and performance 
is the lasting satisfaction that 
comes from its economical opera- 



tion and reasonable upkeep charges. ] 
Built by the Standard Steel Car 
Company, world famous as master 
buildersof railroad rollingstock, the 
Standard Eight does not develop 
weaknesses in construction which 
sometimes show even in high- 
priced cars under rough usage. 

Let us give you a demonstra- 
tion. J 



HACKNEY BROTHERS 

Distributors for North and South Carolina 
WILSON, N. C. Phone 29 




158 




'/ jjf^f' 



2*^' 






1HE graduate of today enters a world 
electrical. 

Gathered from the distant waterfalls or 
generated by the steam turbine, electric 
power is transmitted to the busiest city 
or the smallest country place. 

Through the co-ordination of inventive 
genius with engineering and manufac- 
turing resources, the General Electric 
Company has fostered and developed to 
a high state of perfection these and 
numerous other applications. 

And so electricity, scarcely older than the gradu- 
ate of today, appears in a practical, \\ ell developed 
service on every hand. 

Recognize its power, study its applications to your 
life's work, and utilize it to the utmost for the 
benefit of all mankind. 





General Office 
Schenectady; NY 



mm paw si^ss 



159 






BEAVER BOARD 

FOR BETTER WALLS & CEILINGS 




■yOU can't expect 
* Beaver Board 
results unless this 
trade- mark is on 
the back of the 
board you buy. 



The Old Home Looks Young Again 

It's a surprise for you! 
"Dad and I had th« old cracked walls all 
covered with Beaver Board. The old, dingy wall 
paper is gone, no more ceilings can fall, the old 
home looks young again." 

Beaver Board will give you just as pleasant a sur- 
prise. It comes in big, sturdy panels made from the strong, 
clean fibre of the spruce tree, without a crack, knot or 
blemish — ready to nail over old walls and ceilings or the 
studding of new partitions! For the new home, Beaver 
Board is equally satisfactory. It keeps out cold in winter 
and heat in summer. Patent "Sealtite" surface prevents 
warping. 

Ask for Folder— "New Rooms Within Old Wall: " 

F. L. VOLIVA HARDWARE COMPANY 

DEALERS IN 

Hardware, Builders'' Material, Paints, Glass, Brushes, Etc. 
LIME, PLASTER AND CEMENT A SPECIALTY 

Agents for American and Elmwood Wire 
BELHAVEN, NORTH CAROLINA 




160 



I SELL YOUR TOBACCO 

i 

| WITH 

I 

| CRUTE & FLEMING 

| BANNER WAREHOUSE 

| WILSON, N. C. 

i 
j 
i 

( YOUR BANK BOOK WILL TELL 

! YOU WHY j 



G. T. FULGHUM. PROPRIETOR 
WILSON. N. C. 



I 



j 

! HEAT YOUR HOME WITH A PIPELESS FURNACE | 

i R. E. Hagan & Company 



TINNING ROOFING HEATING j 

j 



T. F. PETTUS COMPANY \ 

< Buggies, Wagons, Harness, Bicycles, Farm Implements , 

Lap Robes, Horse Blankets, Roofing, Wire Fence, etc. j 

I WHOLESALE AND RETAIL ! 



i 

125-127-129 South Goldsboro St. WILSON, N. C. ( 

j 



161 



j 

I 

! NUTRI-LADEN CATTLE FEED 



Wilson, North Carolina 



PHONE 703 



I 



AND 
j 

; NUTRI-LADEN HORSE AND MULE FEED ; 

i 

i 
j 

i 

! ! 

i 1 

I Manufactured by ' 

! ( 

! i 

FARMERS COTTON OIL COMPANY 



! ! 



I 



162 



KNOTT-BORDEN & COMPANY 

Dependable Insurance 
Real Estate 



WE WRITE EVERY KIND OF INSURANCE 



Telephone 226 



WILSON, N. C. 



Fidelity Building 



P. L. WOODARD & COMPANY 
General Merchandise 

GENERAL AGENTS 
CONTENTNEA GUANO COMPANY HIGH GRADE FERTILIZERS 



PHONE ro 



WILSON. N. C. 



SI, 495.00 

CHASSIS 
FACTORY 




RED SEAL CONTINENTAL MOTOR 
BOSCH MAGNETO 
COVERT TRANSMISSION 



TRAFFIC MOTOR SALES CO. 

DISTRIBUTORS WILSON. N. C. 



163 




Member of Florist Telegraph Delivery Association 



164 




Drs. Dickinson & Williams, Proprietors 



For Real Estate or Insurance Call on 

WILSON INSURANCE REALTY COMPANY i 

Established in 190S I 

I 
GEO. T. STRONACH, Secretary. WILSON, N. C. j 



BARNES-HARRELL COMPANY 



Distributors 

Diamond Tires and Tubes 
Western Gun Shells Certain-teed 
Roofing and Paints 



Wholesale Grocers 

WILSON, N. C. 

Bottlers of 

Genuine 

Coca-Cola 



Branch Stores: 
Tarboro, N. C. Goldsboro, N. C. 



165 



This Annual is a Sample of Our Work 

EDWARDS & BROUGHTON 
PRINTING COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Steel and Copper Plate Engravers 
Manufacturers of Blank Books and Loose Leaf Systems of all kinds 



Printers, Publishers 
Stationers 

Engraved Wedding Invitations and Announcements 
Visiting Cards — Fine Monogram Stationery 

College and High School Commencement Invitations 
Fraternity, Sorority and Society Stationery 

# 

HIGH-CLASS PRINTING 

Artistic Catalogues, Booklets, Menus, Invitations, Stationery 
HALFTONES AND ETCHINGS CORRESPONDENCE INVITED 



166 



I CIGARS CIGARETTES TOBACCOS 

I GAYNOR'S 

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| DRIXKS CANDIES BOOKS 



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ON NASH STREET 
OPPOSITE TURLINGTON & MORRISON 



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E. P. HYMAN & COMPANY ! 

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j FARM IMPLEMENTS AND 

! MACHINES 

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j OPPOSITE NORFOLK-SOUTHERN FREIGHT DEPOT WILSON, N. C. 



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j L. S. TOMLINSON, President K. H. WATSON, Vice-President ' 

| N. L. FINCH, Secretary and Treasurer . 

I TOMLINSON & COMPANY I 

* Incorporated I 

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GENERAL MERCHANTS I 



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j COTTON AND FERTILIZERS ; 

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j Branch Offices j 

j BLACK CREEK, N. C. BAILEY, N. C. LILLINGTON, N. C. I 

, KENLY, N. C. MIDDLESEX, N. C. PINETOPS, N. C. I 
| MACCLESFIELD, N. C. 

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"FUCO" FERTILIZERS 



ARE THE BEST FOR TOBACCO, COTTON AND CORN 

MANUFACTURED AND SOLD BY 



STOKES-TOMLINSON 
COMPANY 



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Wilson's Exclusive Men's Shop 
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The Farmers union trading Company, inc. 

I PHONE 24 WILSON, N. C. 



\ BURTON BROTHERS AUCTION COMPANY | 

I "Standard of the South" 

i wilson, n. c. territory unlimited 

Estate and Court Sales Farm Sales Our Specialty 

We Subdivide and Sell at Auction City, Suburban and Farm Property 
Originators and Exclusive Users of the Burton System of Selling Land 
j W. T. BURTON, Owner 

I Auctioneers — W. T. Burton, Sr., Paul A. Burton, W. T. Burton. Jr. 



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FASHION PARK CLOTHES STETSON HATS I 



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"Money's Worth or Money Back" 

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